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Gramm Leach Bliley Act

Zach Carter

Wall Street's Political Payouts Higher For Those Voting To Deregulate

HuffingtonPost.com | Zach Carter | Posted 04.04.2013 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- The recent Wall Street deregulation push in Congress has been fueled by a significant disparity in campaign donations from big banks: Me...

Senator Defends Controversial Move

The Huffington Post | Alexander Eichler | Posted 07.26.2012 | Business

Say this for Phil Gramm: the man sticks to his guns. Thirteen years after helping to repeal the Glass-Steagall Act and under widespread criticism, ...

What Can Give You Economic Misery, an Embolism, and a Backyard Full of Elephants?

Cliff Schecter | Posted 01.09.2012 | Politics
Cliff Schecter

Although when it comes to the specific date of our mass death, Harold Camping might as well be talking Chinese nuclear development with Herman Cain, i...

Return of the Great Triangulator

Robert Scheer | Posted 05.25.2011 | Politics
Robert Scheer

How desperate is Obama that he would turn to the great triangulator, Bill Clinton, who opened the floodgates to banking greed, for validation of the sorry opportunistic hodgepodge that passes for this administration's economic policy?

Party Like It's 1994

Joseph A. Palermo | Posted 05.25.2011 | Politics
Joseph A. Palermo

In the 90s, the major "bipartisan" policies that Bill Clinton enacted when he faced a hostile Republican Congress were all disastrous for the country. What was needed then -- and now -- was nothing short of a wholesale reaffirmation of the role of government in society.

Shahien Nasiripour

10 Years Ago Today, Congress Allowed For "Too Big To Fail"

HuffingtonPost.com | Shahien Nasiripour | Posted 05.25.2011 | Business

On the 10th anniversary of Congress voting to repeal the law that had long separated Main Street commercial banking from Wall Street investment bankin...

Fifty Chimpanzees or One Toothless Gorilla

Deborah Senn | Posted 05.25.2011 | Business
Deborah Senn

AIG's financial meltdown this past week was not the result of failed insurance regulation. (Go ahead. Read that one more time, real slow.)