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Huffington Post Book Club

Finally, Unlimited E-Books

PureWow | Posted 11.06.2013 | Books
PureWow

Some people read two books a year -- most certainly on a beach and most likely while nursing a watered-down Malibu Breeze. You are not one of those people.

Examining Language in 'Brief Wondrous Life Of Oscar Wao'

Led Black | Posted 11.25.2012 | Books
Led Black

The term "un pie aqui y uno alla" (one foot here and one foot there) succinctly describes the bi-national existences led by many of the Dominicans and Dominican-Americans in the United States.

Cataloguing Cultural References In 'Oscar Wao'

Ariana Lenarsky | Posted 11.14.2012 | Books
Ariana Lenarsky

I'm not a huge geek, as far as I know. I'm an avid reader, yes, but after I read The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, I only knew two things for certain: 1) I believe Junot Díaz to be a genius and a beast, and 2) I only caught 1/4th of the novel's pop culture references, tops.

And Our Next Book Club Pick Is...

Zoë Triska | Posted 09.11.2012 | Books
Zoë Triska

Our next HuffPost Book Club pick is The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway. This was my pick, and I am just thrilled that you voted it into the majority!

Join Our Live Chat With SF Native And Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Jennifer Egan

Carly Schwartz | Posted 07.01.2012 | San Francisco

Memo to HuffPost SF book club members: We hope you've started reading our first pick, Jennifer Egan's mesmerizing Pulitzer Prize-winning tale A Visit ...

Drinking Rakija In The Tiger's Wife and Los Angeles

Anna King | Posted 04.01.2012 | Books
Anna King

In my last blog, I mentioned the prevalence of rakija drinking in Obreht's novel, and my subsequent plan to track some down to sip along with my reading. It didn't take long to find.

Death in The Tiger's Wife

Danielle Wiener-Bronner | Posted 03.31.2012 | Books
Danielle Wiener-Bronner

For me, The Tiger's Wife is about the stories we tell ourselves to help us understand death, especially when it is pointless, and especially when it is far away.

The Power of the Unknown

Daisy VanDenburgh | Posted 03.14.2012 | Books
Daisy VanDenburgh

One thing that has really stuck out at me while reading The Tiger's Wife is the power of the unknown and its effect on people. In Chapter 2, Natalia becomes frustrated when she fails to persuade one of the diggers, Duré, to allow her to treat his children for illness.

'The Tiger's Wife': Cancer, War and Booze

Anna King | Posted 03.14.2012 | Books
Anna King

In a novel set in an unnamed, war-ravaged Balkan country where the souls of the dead linger on earth for 40 days to "rummage through drawers and peer inside cupboards," there's going to be much that's strange, exotic and foreign.

This Month's Book Club Pick: The Road From Ruin Charts the Path to Capitalism 2.0

Arianna Huffington | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Arianna Huffington

An open, orthodoxy-free conversation about how we can fix our broken financial system is exactly what we need. Reading The Road From Ruin -- and joining in our month-long discussion about it -- is a great way to start. READ MORE Is Undercover Boss the Most Subversive Show on Television? Undercover Boss is the kind of popular entertainment that can start out as one thing but morph into something that turns a spotlight on just how out of touch America's corporate chiefs are. READ MORE WATCH: Arianna Discusses the Final Push for a Public Option on The Ed Show LISTEN: Arianna Talks About Move Your Money on Public Radio's AirTalk WATCH: Arianna Weighs in on Massa's 'Wasted Hour' with Glenn Beck on AC360

Only Empathy Can Save Us: Why Jeremy Rifkin's The Empathic Civilization Is This Month's HuffPost Book Club Pick

Arianna Huffington | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Arianna Huffington

For this month's HuffPost Book Club, I have chosen Jeremy Rifkin's The Empathic Civilization, which boldly sets out to present nothing less than -- as Rifkin puts it -- "a new rendering of human history."

'Shadow Elite' Author Interview: Janine Wedel And HuffPost Washington Bureau Chief Dan Froomkin Discuss January's Book Club Pick (VIDEO)

The Huffington Post | Amy Hertz and Jessie Kunhardt | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books

Did you miss it? We've wrapped up our exploration of Arianna's second book club pick, Janine Wedel's "Shadow Elite". To finish things off, HuffPost W...

Announcing My First Pick for the HuffPost Book Club: In Praise of Slowness

Arianna Huffington | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Arianna Huffington

My first pick for the HuffPost Book Club is In Praise of Slowness, a terrific book by Carl Honore about the need for a more balanced existence.

In Praise Of Slow Food

Carl Honore | Posted 01.04.2012 | Healthy Living
Carl Honore

The bright news is that people all over the world are taking a slower approach to food -- and eating better as a result.

New Year, New Country? What Arianna Is Reading Next

Amy Hertz | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Amy Hertz

What Arianna is reading is not likely on the front tables of your local bookstore, nor is it on any bestseller list.

'Shadow Elite': Outsourcing Government, Losing Democracy

Charles Lewis | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Charles Lewis

Public and private are now substantially blurred, as the "transnational" political elites and the financial elites have become literally the same people. It is a condition which leaves the people feeling unrepresented.

The Slow Revolution is Growing... Fast

Carl Honore | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Carl Honore

Being Arianna's first pick is a tremendous honor. It also serves up a delicious irony. My book is called In Praise of Slowness. Yet HuffPost is a pioneer on the fastest communication platform ever devised. Not exactly a natural fit.

Arianna And Carl Honore Discuss "In Praise Of Slowness" (VIDEO)

The Huffington Post | Amy Hertz | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books

UPDATE So, did you miss it? Thursday, 3pm November 19th? Yes, that was last week, and it was a live video chat with Arianna and Carl Honore, author o...

Larry Summers, Robert Rubin: Will The Harvard Shadow Elite Bankrupt The University And The Country?

Harry R. Lewis | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Harry R. Lewis

The modern power elites thrive by forgetting any regrettable past. This amnesia is easy at Harvard, where the legal fiduciaries operate in secret and need not answer for their acts.