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Jens Weidmann

Germany and Europe in 2014: A Conversation With Christoph Schmidt

Luka Orešković | Posted 03.05.2014 | Politics
Luka Orešković

Starting with the most heated topic of the moment, Schmidt's belief is that, although OMT has worked well so far, it is stretching the mandate of ECB too far, especially with the limitlessness of the transactions.

Weidmann at Harvard: The Sovereign-Banking Nexus

Luka Orešković | Posted 02.05.2014 | Business
Luka Orešković

Weidmann's "separatist" view clearly stems from the German concept of highly independent central banking, assuring price stability rather than trying to target other problems and ensure macroeconomic stability.

Bank Chief: ECB Cannot Solve Euro Zone Crisis

Reuters | Posted 09.06.2013 | Business

* Calls for governments to press ahead with reforms * Wants abolition of implicit guarantees for banks and sovereigns *...

Europe's Latest Gimmick

Robert Kuttner | Posted 11.09.2012 | World
Robert Kuttner

The EU is now officially back in recession. Unemployment is rising in all of the nations that have submitted to austerity plans. Even the Germans, who benefit from the rest of Europe's pain because capital flight produces very low German interest rates, are headed for a recession later this year, according to the OECD. Europe's economies are prisoners of Merkel's austerity demands on one side, and the speculative attacks of the bond market on the other. In principle, the ECB could extend unlimited support to government bonds, and take the profit out of speculation. Draghi's latest announcement seems to offer just that, but the austerity conditions render it next to useless.

ECB Struggling To Do 'Whatever It Takes' To Save Euro

Reuters | Posted 11.04.2012 | Business

* Monti, Hollande call for action to cut excess borrowing costs * ECB rate decision, news conference on Sept. 6 ...

Don't Blame Bernanke

Robert Kuttner | Posted 10.05.2012 | Politics
Robert Kuttner

If you watched any of the PBS encore broadcast of the Ken Burns documentary, The War, this past week, you have some sense of what kind of a production machine can be energized by government contracts in the face of a depressed economy. There is so much that we could spend that money on -- energy self sufficiency, infrastructure, a smart electrical grid, public transportation, better education at all levels -- all of which would not only create economic activity and jobs, but would make for a more productive economy. But nothing like this is part of the mainstream conversation. If you propose this sort of thing, you are packed off to the Museum of Un-reconstructed Keynesians. White House economists quietly admit that you are right, but you are politically radioactive (even with a Nobel Prize.)

Will Germany Lead?

Scott Malcomson | Posted 08.11.2012 | World
Scott Malcomson

At the Council on the Future of Europe, the dominant note was of nervousness at the state of Spain's financial system, combined with resolve to rally German opinion behind greater fiscal coordination and debt mutualization.

German Official: Without Austerity, Greece 'Financial Aid Falls Away'

AP | Posted 05.12.2012 | Business

BERLIN -- The head of Germany's central bank is warning that there would be no basis for further financial aid to keep Greece afloat if the country ba...

German Central Bank Head: Repeatedly Expanding Bailout Fund Won't Solve Crisis

Posted 12.22.2011 | Business

BERLIN (Reuters) - Bundesbank president Jens Weidmann said in a newspaper interview released on Saturday that repeatedly expanding the euro zone r...