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Kiobel v Royal Dutch Petroleum

Abu Ghraib Torture Survivors Fight on Against Military Contractors

The Center for Constitutional Rights | Posted 11.06.2013 | World
The Center for Constitutional Rights

By Laura Raymond, Advocacy Program Manager at the Center for Constitutional Rights Can you travel abroad, commit war crimes and then return home and ...

224 Years After the Judiciary Act, the U.S. Must Not Become a Safe Haven to Modern Pirates

Katie Shay | Posted 11.26.2013 | Politics
Katie Shay

The Alien Tort Statute (ATS), all but ignored for almost the first 200 years of its existence, states that federal district courts "shall also have cognizance, ... of all causes where an alien sues for a tort only in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States."

On the Least Dangerous Branch and the Politics of Judging

Ray Brescia | Posted 07.08.2013 | Politics
Ray Brescia

Whether the Court's recent turns will threaten the public's perception of the Court, and the court system as a whole, remains to be seen. But the jury is out, and the data seems to be coming in: The Court appears in the midst of a significant partisan turn, one that could threaten its long-term legitimacy.

The Wrong Decision for Human Rights

Katie Shay | Posted 06.18.2013 | Politics
Katie Shay

The Court's decision in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum (Shell) limits accountability for gross human rights abuse committed abroad and it gives foreign corporations preferential treatment over domestic businesses.

Supreme Court Shoots Down Foreign Human Rights Abuse Victims

AP | MARK SHERMAN | Posted 04.17.2013 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court has limited the ability of foreign victims of human rights abuses to use American courts to seek accountability and mo...

20 Years Later, Shell Hopes Supreme Court Will Endorse 'Business As Usual'

Katie Redford | Posted 04.27.2013 | World
Katie Redford

This Supreme Court has already ruled that companies have a First Amendment protected right to purchase elections. Now it should recognize that when corporations are granted the same rights as human beings, they must also be endowed with the same responsibilities.

Moment of Truth: Human Rights at the Supreme Court

Katie Redford | Posted 12.04.2012 | World
Katie Redford

Justice Kagan actually read from the Sosa opinion, reminding us that yesterday's pirate is the modern-day torturer, and our courts should keep the doors open to victims of these kinds of universally condemned human rights abuses

Arrrr! Shell Tries to Plunder Human Rights

Katie Redford | Posted 11.19.2012 | World
Katie Redford

Shell's lawyers actually argued to the Supreme Court that a hypothetical company -- Pirates Incorporated -- should not be held accountable for their crimes, because, you guessed it, they're a corporation.

Will $21 Million Somalia Judgment Be the Last of Its Kind?

Katie Redford | Posted 10.30.2012 | World
Katie Redford

This week, a group of Somalians subjected to torture and other human rights abuses by the Somalian regime received a measure of justice before a U.S. federal district court. This year, will the U.S. Supreme Court allow such cases to continue?

Human Rights Violations Cast a Dark Shadow Over the London Olympics

Katie Redford | Posted 10.22.2012 | World
Katie Redford

The stories behind gold medal triumphs are always front and center on the Olympic stage, celebrating hard work, dedication, and courage, and inspiring millions. But this year, there's a different gold medal tale that has gone untold.

This American Right: On Genocide and the Supreme Court

Ray Brescia | Posted 08.22.2012 | Politics
Ray Brescia

Congress created this right, and it has served to promote principals of international justice for over two centuries. The Supreme Court must not now render the statute worthless by gutting its most important, and most powerful, component.

What Does Shell Have in Common With General Ratko Mladic?

Katie Redford | Posted 07.23.2012 | Business
Katie Redford

What does Royal Dutch Shell have in common with General Ratko Mladic, former commander of the Bosnian Serb army? More than you'd think...

Free to Speak, Free to Kill?

Brian Giacometti | Posted 06.12.2012 | Politics
Brian Giacometti

The personhood debate stems from legal rights enjoyed by corporations. Do they have standing in court? Can they donate to their favorite politician? Do they have freedom of speech? And joking aside, these are legitimate debates.

Mike Sacks

Supreme Court Expands Corporate Human Rights Case, Avoids Corporate Liability Question

HuffingtonPost.com | Mike Sacks | Posted 03.05.2012 | Politics

The Supreme Court on Monday afternoon took the unusual action of ordering reargument in the case heard last week that has been brought against a multi...

How "Drill, Baby, Drill" and "Yes We Can" Got Married

Subhankar Banerjee | Posted 05.02.2012 | Green
Subhankar Banerjee

Once upon Sarah Palin uttered the now (in)famous phrase "Drill, Baby, Drill." Also, once upon a time Barack Obama uttered the now (in)famous phrase "Yes We Can." These two phrases got married along the way, and will now produce their baby "Kill, Baby, Kill."

Supreme Court: Are Corporations Liable for Aiding and Abetting Crimes Against Humanity?

Valerie Brender | Posted 04.29.2012 | World
Valerie Brender

Whatever happens with the Kiobel decision, it will be a watershed moment for corporate accountability.

Welcome to the Corporatocracy, Where Life Is Nasty, Brutish and Short

Thom Hartmann | Posted 04.29.2012 | Politics
Thom Hartmann

The Supreme Court is set to hear a case that could give corporations the power to commit genocide with no consequences. The High Court has agreed to ...

Corporate Crime and Punishment

Arvind Ganesan | Posted 04.29.2012 | Politics
Arvind Ganesan

Should corporations have immunity for human rights abuses? Today, the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case that will decide whether corporations will be exempted from a crucial law that allows foreign victims of serious human rights abuses to sue them in US courts for civil damages.

Mike Sacks

Supreme Court Looks Ready To Grant Corporate Immunity In Human Rights Case

HuffingtonPost.com | Mike Sacks | Posted 02.28.2012 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Tuesday morning appeared divided along party lines, with a conservative majority ready to hold that corporations ca...

Mike Sacks

Corporate Personhood Case Forces Justices To Hack New Path

HuffingtonPost.com | Mike Sacks | Posted 02.28.2012 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- On Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court will hear oral argument on whether corporations, like real people, can be held liable in American ...

Mike Sacks

Supreme Court Debates Again Whether Corporations Are People

HuffingtonPost.com | Mike Sacks | Posted 12.16.2011 | Politics

This article is in collaboration with The Dylan Ratigan Show's "Mad As Hell" series. WASHINGTON -- A multinational oil company will be coming to th...

The Supreme Court, Corporations and Human Rights

Bama Athreya | Posted 12.27.2011 | Politics
Bama Athreya

What will the Supreme Court do? Will it with one hand treat corporations as persons to give them first amendment protection, and with the other hand treat them as non-persons when it comes to liability for human rights violations?

Mike Sacks

Supreme Court To Rule On Corporate Personhood For Crimes Against Humanity

HuffingtonPost.com | Mike Sacks | Posted 12.17.2011 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday morning agreed to hear a case over whether corporations can be sued in federal courts for human rights viola...

Five Ways to Protect Corporate Executives From Catastrophic Liability

Ben Kerschberg | Posted 05.25.2011 | Business
Ben Kerschberg

Individual corporate executives and directors of multinational corporations will soon face high-stakes lawsuits for alleged human rights violations by...

Corporate Executives: Get Ready for a Billion Dollar Lawsuit

Ben Kerschberg | Posted 05.25.2011 | Business
Ben Kerschberg

A recent court decision being hailed as the end of the multi-billion dollar Alien Tort Statute litigation industry is anything but, as plaintiffs' cross-hairs will simply shift from corporations to the individuals who serve them.