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Literature

Women's History Month Spotlight: Advice From the 19th Century, on Loneliness and Doubt, Horses, Vacuum Cleaners and the Nature of Time

Carole DeSanti | Posted 05.28.2013 | Books
Carole DeSanti

In honor of women's history month and to celebrate the paperback publication of The Unruly Passions of Eugénie R., I arranged an interview with Eugénie R. herself (heretofore known only as my fictional character) to find out how this 19th century woman feels about our 21st century world.

The Books of Our Lives

Rachael Berkey | Posted 05.26.2013 | Books
Rachael Berkey

The books that change our lives. It sounds like the dramatic segue into the credits of a soap opera, but it's kind of true right? There are those books that change the way you see the world, a person or yourself that stay with you forever.

Simon & Schuster vs. Barnes & Noble

Terence Clarke | Posted 05.25.2013 | Books
Terence Clarke

The current dispute between the book retailer Barnes & Noble and the publisher Simon & Schuster has caused much handwringing and worry. But the dispute is one that has visited all changing industries fighting a rear-guard action against newer, more visionary competition.

Let's Re-Learn How to Read for the Common Core

Stephen Chiger | Posted 05.23.2013 | College
Stephen Chiger

The Common Core is a reminder of the credo literature professors live by. Language is the building block of great sentences, great paragraphs, great chapters, and great books. We cannot take it for granted.

Difference and Deliverance in the Digital Age

Ruth Starkman | Posted 05.20.2013 | Books
Ruth Starkman

The Deliverance of Others offers political and aesthetic reflections on the global age and interrogates received conceptions of rationality, the family, the body, and human capacities for emotional connection.

Michael Deibert's Haiti Bookshelf

Michael Deibert | Posted 03.18.2013 | Impact
Michael Deibert

Despite its image of relentless poverty and political unrest, Haiti is the most beguiling and charming of destinations for foreign observers, but also one of the most maddeningly complex.

Ayana Mathis, Author of the Bestselling Novel The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, on How She Reacted When Oprah Winfrey Called

Brad Listi | Posted 05.18.2013 | Books
Brad Listi

Here's an excerpt from Episode 157, my conversation with Ayana Mathis, author of the bestselling novel The Twelve Tribes of Hattie. It was hand-selected by Oprah Winfrey as an official pick of Oprah's Book Club 2.0.

When a Nice Jewish Author Reads a Christian Novel

Amy Sue Nathan | Posted 05.12.2013 | Books
Amy Sue Nathan

I'm not suggesting every Jewish person read a novel published by a Christian publisher, but I am thinking if you see or hear of a book of any kind that is a little outside your ordinary, try it. You might find it's something very familiar.

Lenore Zion, Novelist and Sex Therapist, on How a Wild Night in High School Helped to Inspire Her New Book, Stupid Children

Brad Listi | Posted 05.11.2013 | Books
Brad Listi

Here's an excerpt from Episode 155, my conversation with Lenore Zion, an author who also works as a sex therapist.

How Viral Is Social Media?

Greg Jacobs | Posted 05.07.2013 | College
Greg Jacobs

This may sound a little absolutist, but at the end of the day, who is really controlling what you post online? Is that ironic music video your status because you actually enjoy it, or is it online because you want people to see how funny you are?

'Birds of Paradise Lost': A Conversation With Author Andrew Lam

Andrew Lam | Posted 05.05.2013 | Books
Andrew Lam

EDITOR'S NOTE: New America Media editor Andrew Lam has made his name as a journalist, but in his newest book, his past as a Vietnamese refugee reverbe...

'Fish Out of Water' and Into the Pages of Books

Dave Astor | Posted 04.30.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

Readers -- many of whom have been "fish out of water" themselves during vacations or after moving to new towns (or countries) -- can compare their own real-life experiences with the fictional ones depicted by authors.

London's Most Literate Pubs

Viator | Posted 04.29.2013 | Travel
Viator

Dickens mentions the Spaniards in his novel The Pickwick Papers, Bram Stoker names it in Dracula and Keats allegedly wrote Ode to a Nightingale in the garden.

Tripping Over a Great Read

Rachael Berkey | Posted 04.27.2013 | Books
Rachael Berkey

How do books come into your life, reader? Are you a browser of Amazon? A wanderer of bookstores? A receiver of bookish care packages from well-meaning family members?

Sh*t Rough Drafts Creates Funny Twist On Classic Books

Posted 02.22.2013 | Books

Even Moses had trouble when he began writing The Book of Genesis. That is, according to Paul Laudiero's hilarious tumblr, 'Shit Rough Drafts.' In ...

Revolutionary Days

William E. White | Posted 04.23.2013 | Impact
William E. White

"We the People" create the institutions that serve us. It's easy to forget that we -- individual citizens -- are the ones responsible for our children's education.

17 Unreliable Narrators In Literature

Posted 02.21.2013 | Books

"If you really want to hear about it..." opens Holden Caulfield's narration in J.D. Salinger's The Catcher In The Rye. Yet can we believe a word this ...

The Case For Libraries

Foz Meadows | Posted 04.17.2013 | Books
Foz Meadows

If someone too poor or otherwise unable to buy a specific product is given that product for free, has the product's creator lost a sale?

A Look at Hypocritical Characters in Literature

Dave Astor | Posted 04.16.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

One big reason why people read fiction is to feel strong emotions -- joy, surprise, anger, etc. And when it comes to anger, few literary experiences make our blood boil more than observing the actions of hypocritical protagonists.

Remembering A Broken Romance on Valentine's Day; Or How I Became A Writer

Andrew Lam | Posted 04.15.2013 | GPS for the Soul
Andrew Lam

What do you do when you graduate from Berkeley with a broken heart and a B.A. in biochemistry? You break your immigrant parents' hearts and become a w...

Some 'Difficult' Books Aren't as Difficult as We Think

Dave Astor | Posted 04.09.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

You know that dreaded nine-letter word describing certain novels. The word that makes literature students run screaming from classrooms and older readers tremble even when dressed warmly. Yes, the word is (gasp) "difficult"!

Tackling Abortion in YA Literature

A.J. Walkley | Posted 04.08.2013 | Books
A.J. Walkley

As a writer, I've always turned to the written word to piece together the ways of the world, and to better understand myself and others. I knew that in this matter, it would be no different -- I would write a book that got to the heart of a decision that polarizes so many of us.

I'm With Stupid: Joyce in China Bigger Than Hasselhoff in Germany

Todd Hartley | Posted 04.06.2013 | Comedy
Todd Hartley

I once read somewhere that James Joyce's novel Ulysses was the best book ever written, so a few years ago when I found an old copy for a dollar, I bought it.

Music in Literature

Dave Astor | Posted 04.02.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

People who love both fiction and music might waffle Hamlet-like about whether to enjoy a book or some tunes in their free time. But there's a way to combine both!

Jane Austen and Zombies: Old Novels, New Insights

Evan Gottlieb | Posted 03.31.2013 | Books
Evan Gottlieb

As bookshelves (and e-readers) continue to groan with knock-offs of Seth Grahame-Smith's knock-off, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, it seems worth asking: are zombies and ninjas the only way to make the novels of previous centuries relevant again?