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Literature

This Movie Is Paul Thomas Anderson Meets Thomas Pynchon Meets J.D. Salinger

Bernard Radfar | Posted 11.24.2013 | Entertainment
Bernard Radfar

Now that we know a little too much about Salinger, will the real Thomas Pynchon please step forward. It is time, Tom. I get it, the work is the message, the gift.

A Bad Week for America's Invisible Men and Women, and for Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man

Lester & Charlie | Posted 11.23.2013 | Politics
Lester & Charlie

Recently, Congress decided that cutting $40 billion from the food stamps program would be a good idea. After all, that budget works out to a whole couple of bucks a day for a portion of the 40+ million Americans living below the poverty line.

Literature, What Is It Good For?

Evan Gottlieb | Posted 11.23.2013 | Books
Evan Gottlieb

Recently, there has been another outbreak of public debate regarding what value, if any, the teaching of the liberal arts in general, and literature in particular, stills hold for college students.

Literary Monogamy and Polygamy

Dave Astor | Posted 11.12.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

For a number of years, liking a novel by a certain author set me off on a binge of consecutively reading other books by the same author. It made sense. If you love one fictional work by an author, there's a good chance you'll at least like another.

Meaningful Work in The Pale King: In Memory of David Foster Wallace, Five Years On

Christopher Michaelson, Ph.D. | Posted 11.10.2013 | Books
Christopher Michaelson, Ph.D.

That point is the solace the author left behind for us, as we mourn the fifth anniversary of Wallace's untimely passing with the recognition that no more new words from him are forthcoming.

Coraline, by Neil Gaiman: The First Decade

Anne Margaret Daniel | Posted 11.09.2013 | Books
Anne Margaret Daniel

A generation of children has now grown up with, and cherishes, this story of an intrepid, likeable little girl named Coraline Jones, at the end of her summer school holidays in East Sussex, not so long ago.

A Glorious Voice-Seamus Heaney

Lorie Karnath | Posted 11.09.2013 | Arts
Lorie Karnath

hen the world lost Seamus Heaney, so departed among its most glorious of voices. While the gift of his written voice will continue to live on indefinitely, the expressively inspiring tones of the poet's physical sound have sadly been extinguished.

"All Writers Are Egomaniacal, Manic Depressive, Drug-Addicted Alcoholics"

The European Magazine | Posted 11.06.2013 | Books
The European Magazine

For bestselling author T.C. Boyle, writing is both an obsessive-compulsive behavior and the highest thing he can aspire to. He talked with Max Tholl to discuss the educative purpose of art, teaching creativity and the deepest desires of human nature.

Chevy Chase Is Having The Worst Luck

Posted 11.05.2013 | Comedy

He's Chevy Chase, and you're not. And if that means that you're able to read classic works of literature without the books attacking you, you're proba...

Seamus Heaney: Words of Comfort

Anne Margaret Daniel | Posted 11.04.2013 | Books
Anne Margaret Daniel

His family and friends are in mourning for Seamus Heaney, who died in Dublin on August 30. They are joined by a world of acquaintances and admirers, both known and unknown to Heaney himself, whose grieving is for the poet and the man -- if those could be separated.

Fall Into Reading With These Shiny Apple Picks

Kim Michele Richardson | Posted 11.03.2013 | Books
Kim Michele Richardson

Looking for Me draws us into the complexity of finding love, hope and redemption amidst crushing family obstacles. A moving read about finding the jewels amongst the cast-offs of life's heartbreaks.

Why Poetry Makes Sense: An Interview With Stephen Burt

Laura Cococcia | Posted 10.31.2013 | Arts
Laura Cococcia

Stephen Burt and I discussed the instructive and useful nature of poetry: how it's a vehicle for self-expression, a valuable means of understanding the world and a resource that is written for an infinite set of audiences.

Readers Live for That Occasional Transcendent Novel

Dave Astor | Posted 10.30.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

A book that's transcendent for one reader might not be transcendent for another. Still, the hope of finding novels we personally consider extraordinary is one of the draws of loving literature.

Roots of California Bohemia Lurk in a Hollywood Alley

Lionel Rolfe | Posted 10.27.2013 | Books
Lionel Rolfe

Maybe a block or so away from Paramount Pictures, deep in Hollywood, there's a short alley, La Vista Court, which is a real nexus of California bohemianism. It contains an unusual building with a bas relief of the great, bohemian writer Jack London.

Interview With Critically Acclaimed Author, Alan Kaufman

Lisa Chau | Posted 03.25.2014 | Books
Lisa Chau

Alan Kaufman, the Bronx-born son of a French-Jewish Holocaust survivor, is author of the critically acclaimed memoirs Jew Boy and Drunken Angel. Kaufman's writings are subversive articulations of extreme outsiderness.

Genesis Deflowered: 50 Shades of the Bible

Jeremy Bent | Posted 10.22.2013 | Books
Jeremy Bent

While sex and religion both are now acceptable for dinner conversation, imagine a book that would cause a chorus of indignant gasps during the main course. Genesis Deflowered, a new book that smashes sex and religion together, fits that description nicely.

The Casual Versatility of Some Hardworking Writers

Dave Astor | Posted 10.15.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

And literature's MVP (Most Versatile Producer) is... Actually, I'm not sure. But any author who can write very different types of novels deserves an award.

Lalo Is the Word, Puerto Rico His Nation

Monica Gutierrez | Posted 08.13.2013 | Arts
Monica Gutierrez

Eduardo Lalo's selection as this year's recipient of the prestigious Rómulo Gallegos International Novel Prize is an event of transcendental signific...

Novels With or Without Flashbacks

Dave Astor | Posted 10.08.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

When it comes to literature, there are many contrasts -- including "literary" novels vs. mass-market ones, long-ago classics vs. modern fiction and chronological novels vs. non-chronological ones.

We Will Be Fooled Again: The Strange Pleasures of Narrative Trickery

Evan Gottlieb | Posted 10.05.2013 | Books
Evan Gottlieb

For readers, the pleasures of the unreliable narrator seem to lie primarily in the challenges they offer our critical and interpretive faculties. Can we figure out the narrator's trustworthiness (or lack of it) before the other characters do?

Sex and the Novelist

Warren Adler | Posted 09.25.2013 | Books
Warren Adler

When I first began writing novels, I used to think a lot about sex. It was, of course, before everything changed.

Would Naguib Mahfouz Oppose the Military Coup in Egypt?

Alparslan Akkuş | Posted 09.23.2013 | World
Alparslan Akkuş

As a citizen of a country that had to live through five coup d'états and military memorandums in last five decades, I advise my Egyptian friends to beware of any type of military rule. A day will come when a new generation of writers grown up on Naguib Mahfouz's books will tell the story of today's coup.

Praise for Annie Rachele Lanzillotto's Writing

Michael Carosone | Posted 09.17.2013 | Gay Voices
Michael Carosone

I had the privilege of attending one of Annie Rachele Lanzillotto's events for her two new books: her memoir, L Is for Lion: An Italian Bronx Butch Fr...

Unlike Rowling, They Were Denied Literary Fame

Dave Astor | Posted 09.18.2013 | Books
Dave Astor

J.K. Rowling tried to go under the radar by using a pen name for The Cuckoo's Calling, but many other great authors spent all or part of their careers involuntarily missing out on the literary cachet and cash they deserved.

Stranger in a Strange Land: a Malawian Experience and the Novel Vuto

A.J. Walkley | Posted 09.16.2013 | Books
A.J. Walkley

When I think back on my first impressions of Malawi, Africa, setting foot in the country as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in 2007, I always come back t...