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Microorganisms

David Freeman

LISTEN: How Our Obsession With Killing Bacteria Could Actually Be Killing Us

HuffingtonPost.com | David Freeman | Posted 05.20.2014 | Science

Dr. Martin J. Blaser has one big theory about a lot of little things. The little things are microorganisms--the estimated 100-plus trillion bacter...

WATCH: Tiny Tentacled 'Monsters' Found In Animal's Guts

Posted 04.06.2013 | Science

By: Megan Gannon, News Editor Published: 04/04/2013 02:48 PM EDT on LiveScience Scientists have discovered two new species of strange-looking micr...

Microbes Likely Roam Deep Within Ocean's Crust

Posted 03.15.2013 | Science

By: Becky Oskin, OurAmazingPlanet Staff Writer Published: 03/14/2013 02:02 PM EDT on LiveScience An entire ecosystem living without light or oxyge...

Cara Santa Maria

WATCH: Tiny Solution For Big Oil Problem?

HuffingtonPost.com | Cara Santa Maria | Posted 02.25.2013 | Science

"Directed evolution" may save our polluted planet. At least, chemical engineer Dr. Frances Arnold sees it that way. The recent National Medal of T...

Gut Check: Science Probes Frontier Within Us Made Up of Millions and Billions of Microbes

Glenn D. Braunstein, M.D. | Posted 04.17.2013 | Los Angeles
Glenn D. Braunstein, M.D.

The microbiome is a relatively new frontier for scientists, who have only begun to examine how microbes might affect the function of our bodies.

Filmmaker Finds Bizarre Sea Life At Ocean's Deepest Spot

Posted 12.06.2012 | Science

By: Becky Oskin, OurAmazingPlanet Staff Writer Published: 12/05/2012 04:58 PM EST on OurAmazingPlanet SAN FRANCISCO — The deepest place on the pl...

E.T. Secrets Hide Beneath Ice On Earth, Scientists Say

Posted 05.29.2012 | Science

Microbes living at the edges of Arctic ice sheets could help researchers pinpoint evidence for similar microorganisms that may have evolved on Mars,...

A Black Queen in a Blue Ocean: How Microbes Evolve to Depend on Each Other

Jeff Morris | Posted 07.02.2012 | Science
Jeff Morris

Why was it advantageous for the last common ancestor of all life to sacrifice self-sufficiency -- in other words, why is the world no longer the province of a small number of "jack of all trades" species?

How Extremophiles Might Help Us Save the World

Levi Novey | Posted 05.25.2011 | Green
Levi Novey

Living and thriving in the most inhospitable conditions on Earth, tiny bacteria-like microbes known as extremophiles might soon have an over-sized effect on our human world.