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National Cancer Institute

Our Shamefully Wimpy War Against Cancer

Dr. Sten Odenwald | Posted 06.16.2014 | Healthy Living
Dr. Sten Odenwald

Why do so many groups think that $4.9 billion per year is an acceptable level for cancer research and vote to continue this year after year, even though nearly everyone will have to deal with cancer during their lifetimes? Who came up with this figure?

Funding Cancer Research: The Danger of Brightly Colored Ribbons

Joaquin M. Espinosa | Posted 03.19.2014 | Science
Joaquin M. Espinosa

Pink ribbons are for breast cancer, dark blue ribbons are for colon cancer, and so on. But cancer is more a disease of genes than one of specific tissues, so the specialization of our research and educational efforts based solely on a given cancer's tissue of origin could have detrimental aspects.

With Fewer Cancer Deaths, What Should You Do Now?

Cary A. Presant, M.D. | Posted 03.15.2014 | Healthy Living
Cary A. Presant, M.D.

Still the most feared of all diseases, cancer now has some good news. But the responsibility is yours to make sure you are one of the good statistics, not one of the bad ones.

A Call for Cancer Prevention Action

Bill Couzens | Posted 02.02.2014 | Healthy Living
Bill Couzens

Cancer prevention should not be just experiments performed in a laboratory or a reason for building a new medical center, but rather cancer prevention must include looking at the choices we make in our everyday lives and in business.

Family Guy, Brian Griffin and the Childhood Cancer Equation

Jonathan Agin | Posted 02.01.2014 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

I admit it. I am a huge fan of the animated show Family Guy. The Griffin family has provided me with much distraction at some of the most stressful points of my daughter Alexis' cancer journey and beyond.

The Invisible Epidemic: Lesbians and Cancer

Victoria A. Brownworth | Posted 01.23.2014 | Women
Victoria A. Brownworth

Now the pink has been put away for another year and breast cancer is no longer in the spotlight. Unless you happen to be a breast cancer survivor or be battling the disease yourself, that is -- like me and millions of other women, many of us lesbians.

Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk in Washington, D.C. and the Race to Know When Not to Treat

Rosemary Gibson | Posted 01.23.2014 | Healthy Living
Rosemary Gibson

Better screening tools are detecting more cancers. Women's lives have been saved. These same tools are identifying more cancers that won't result in any harm.

She Has A Very Good Reason For Hating The Government Shutdown

The Huffington Post | Kate Abbey-Lambertz | Posted 10.09.2013 | Healthy Living

A Michigan woman struggling with ovarian cancer took an attention-grabbing approach to voicing her displeasure with the government shutdown. On Tuesda...

Childhood Cancer Awareness Month: 8 Brutal Truths to Choke On

Suzanne Leigh | Posted 11.03.2013 | Impact
Suzanne Leigh

As a parent who lost her child to a brain tumor, I'm commemorating September's Childhood Cancer Awareness Month by red-flagging those obstacles that prevent us from raising survival rates for our youngest warriors.

Childhood Cancer Advocacy and Direction: The Tail Wagging the Dog

Jonathan Agin | Posted 10.01.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

I believe that insistence must be placed upon investing in research that has multiple controls in the form of collaborative checks and balances.

Still in the Trenches: A New Book Examines the Toll of the 'War on Cancer'

Julie Flynn Badal | Posted 07.24.2013 | Science
Julie Flynn Badal

In the new book The Truth in Small Doses, Clifton Leaf asks why there hasn't been more success in reducing the cancer threat, considering the enormous investment in research. He argues that a "strange, dispiriting, dysfunctional" cancer culture has actually stood in the way of progress.

Sorting the Wheat from the Chaff: How Do We Know Which Cancer Therapies Really Work?

American Statistical Association | Posted 08.12.2013 | Science
American Statistical Association

How do we know which newly touted treatments really work (i.e., are safe and effective) and which do not? The best way, and one that has led to steady progress in the treatment of many types of cancer in recent decades, is through the randomized controlled clinical trial.

Child Soldiers -- The Forgotten Victims

Jonathan Agin | Posted 07.28.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

This Memorial Day, we paused to offer thanks to all those men and women who have bravely and selflessly donned the uniform of our country to ensure ou...

Thinking Outside the Box to Make Significant Advances in Disease Research

Jeff MacKeigan | Posted 07.03.2013 | Science
Jeff MacKeigan

Even though basic science is vital for clinical development of new medicines, research as a whole still needs to find a way to rise above incremental improvements and "think outside the box." Innovative and unorthodox approaches are the tickets to major advances.

My Childhood Cancer Road Map - Epilogue

Jonathan Agin | Posted 06.18.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

The manner in which we as a country have been attacking the cancer problem is not working. Cancer still takes kids from their families on a daily, weekly and yearly basis and the incidence rates are not lessening. That is unacceptable.

Bringing Us All Together - Part IV

Jonathan Agin | Posted 06.10.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

From my earliest entree into blogging in my daughter Alexis' journal, I learned quickly that the childhood cancer community was a very disorganized and dis-unified group of entities and individuals who all had the same ultimate goal: a cure.

Arguing for Increases in Federal Funding for Childhood Cancer Research -- Part III

Jonathan Agin | Posted 06.03.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

Money makes the world go 'round. Or so we are told. Certainly for medical research, this is true. And, for the childhood cancer community, it is clear where we fall in the federal spectrum, i.e. on the low end of the stick.

'Cancer Prevention Tips' to Avoid

Angela Logomasini, Ph.D. | Posted 04.23.2013 | Healthy Living
Angela Logomasini, Ph.D.

If you want to reduce your cancer risks, be careful what advice you follow. A number of activist groups offer a range of cancer-fighting tips that don't mesh with the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) latest report on cancer trends.

National Cancer Institute Funds Tea Party Witch Hunt

Bill Frezza | Posted 04.21.2013 | Politics
Bill Frezza

Is it so radical to believe that smoking--like junk food snarfing, motorcycle riding, sky diving, mountain climbing, promiscuous sex, and running with scissors--is a matter of individual choice, otherwise known as freedom?

Reassuring News About Fertility Treatments

Reuters | Posted 04.22.2013 | Parents

Feb 18 (Reuters) - Women getting fertility treatments can be reassured that in vitro fertilization (IVF) does not increase their risk of breast and ...

The Empty Chair of Harold Varmus, M.D.

Jonathan Agin | Posted 04.14.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

It could not be more important that the federal government, through the direction of NCI, does more to fight childhood cancer.

We Can Prevent Cancer Before Curing It

Gabe Canales | Posted 04.14.2013 | Healthy Living
Gabe Canales

Don't get me wrong. We must continue to support the goal of conquering cancer. But we must ask the National Cancer Institute to allocate more funding for prevention, and we must research better, more accurate diagnostics.

Open Letter to President Obama

Jonathan Agin | Posted 03.24.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

I wanted to take this opportunity to bring to light an issue that I think deserves much more awareness and attention on the federal level. Childhood cancer. Childhood cancer is the number one disease killer of our children in this country. Were you aware of this fact?

Are We Not Recalcitrant Enough?

Jonathan Agin | Posted 03.16.2013 | Impact
Jonathan Agin

For those of us who fight for greater federal funding, it is simply not acceptable to allow childhood cancer to be so poorly treated and under-recognized.

A Movement to Fight HPV Throat Cancer

Pamela Tom | Posted 01.21.2013 | Healthy Living
Pamela Tom

Strong, active men like Jeff won't think to seek medical help when they feel a lump in their throat or have difficulty swallowing. Public education will hopefully change that.