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Pandemic

Blaming Obama for Ebola? Dysfunctional Politics and Dread Disease

M. Gregg Bloche, M.D., J.D. | Posted 11.07.2014 | Politics
M. Gregg Bloche, M.D., J.D.

Did the Democrats lose the Senate over Ebola? Pundits are parsing the exit polls, and they'll no doubt come to contradictory conclusions. But the surreal notion that President Obama's incompetence put America at risk for dread disease fed Republican efforts to cast Democrats as a danger to the nation.

Ebola and Public Health Versus the 'Bottom Line'

Bernard Starr | Posted 10.24.2014 | Politics
Bernard Starr

If Ebola continued as confined outbreaks for a limited time, a patent for a drug to treat it, or a vaccine to prevent it, might not feed the corporate bottom line. So we have waited for a desperate crisis when a cure might bring enough profit to light up the bottom line.

The Sum of Our Fears

John Feffer | Posted 10.23.2014 | Politics
John Feffer

The Internet and social media now puts all of us, the intrepid and the faint-hearted, at the same table together and aggregates our fears. Our collective challenge is to reverse the equation, roll up our sleeves, and use the sum of our talents to address the real threats to society.

Is Ebola Scaring You? 5 Reasons You Don't Have to Worry

Barbara Alvarez | Posted 12.10.2014 | Healthy Living
Barbara Alvarez

Let's clear up one huge misconception right here: Ebola cannot be spread by casual contact, shaking someone's hand or after inhaling airborne germs. Transmission requires coming into direct contact with bodily fluids, which include feces, saliva, sweat, urine and vomit.

How Authorities Are Bracing For The Next Ebola

Posted 10.02.2014 | Healthy Living

By Allyn Gaestel for OZY Can the global health system stop Ebola? The answer has more to do with Samuel Kazirharo than you might expect. Kazirah...

The Increasing Threat of Factory Farms

Rachel Avalon | Posted 11.12.2014 | Green
Rachel Avalon

With ugly politics and intense greed blocking the way, it's up to us to turn things around and vote with our forks to better protect our own health, each other, and the planet we (as well as countless species) call home.

Q&A With Yvonne Ventresca, Author of the YA Novel 'Pandemic'

Mary Pauline Lowry | Posted 08.12.2014 | Books
Mary Pauline Lowry

In her riveting debut young adult novel Pandemic, Yvonne Ventresca tells the story of Lilianna, a traumatized teenager struggling to survive a bird flu pandemic.

The Undead and Us

John Feffer | Posted 01.23.2014 | World
John Feffer

I thought it was a fad, and it would die out. I was wrong. Zombies don't die, and neither does our fascination with them. All this leaves the unanswered question: why?

Interview With a Zombie: Insights Into Pandemics

Dr. William Karesh | Posted 12.20.2013 | Healthy Living
Dr. William Karesh

Kids are back in school sharing their germs, flu season has begun, millions of people have just returned home from the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, and...

Pennies to Prevent Pandemics -- Virodiversity as a Grand Challenge for Global Health Security

Dr. William Karesh | Posted 11.06.2013 | Impact
Dr. William Karesh

For the cost of a packet of sweetener for your coffee just once each year, we could understand what is lurking around us, reduce outbreaks, speed diagnosis and control of new emerging diseases, discover new cures, and protect us from continual and massive economic losses.

What Are the Chances of a Devastating Pandemic Occurring in the Next 50 Years?

Quora | Posted 10.29.2013 | Science
Quora

Fairly likely. And it's easy to see why. There are a few facets of modern society that make a devastating pandemic not only possible, but likely.

7 Common Myths About Pandemics and New Diseases

Dr. William Karesh | Posted 08.27.2013 | Healthy Living
Dr. William Karesh

Myth 1: They're just a public health problem. Novel diseases and pandemics typically are perceived to fall squarely into the public health realm. Paradoxically, they actually interface with nearly every other sector.

Our Generation's Security Challenge: Eliminating Nuclear Weapons

Joel Rubin | Posted 08.24.2013 | Politics
Joel Rubin

There are approximately 17,300 nuclear weapons in the world across nine countries. Of these, nearly 7,700 are in the United States.

Surprised by MERS? The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

Dr. William Karesh | Posted 08.12.2013 | Green
Dr. William Karesh

As with earthquakes, we can do much to reduce the chances of people being hurt by emerging infectious diseases. We know where new diseases are most likely to occur. We need to invest more effort in developing countries, especially those that are rapidly changing.

Pretense and Defense of Our Skin in the Game

David Katz, M.D. | Posted 07.15.2013 | Healthy Living
David Katz, M.D.

The world is ever smaller. Flu strains incubating in China can be in New York or LA or DC in the span of a day. This is a world in which an incurable bacterial disease, spread by a tiny insect native to Asia, decimates the citrus crop in Florida.

When Global Catastrophes Collide: The Climate Engineering Double Catastrophe

Seth Baum | Posted 04.22.2013 | Green
Seth Baum

It could be difficult for human civilization to survive a global catastrophe like rapid climate change, nuclear war, or a pandemic disease outbreak. But imagine if two catastrophes strike at the same time.

The Global Supply Chain: Our Economy, Security and Health Depends on It

Stanley M. Bergman | Posted 03.29.2013 | Business
Stanley M. Bergman

The world's supply chain forms the backbone of our global economy, security and health, and the risks it faces are many. What to do? We cannot plan for precisely how or when, but we can plan for the fact that disruptions will strike.

A Few Flu Facts

Nathan Risinger | Posted 02.15.2013 | Healthy Living
Nathan Risinger

On the surface, the flu vaccine seems like a no-brainer. History has shown us influenza can be a devastating and lethal disease worth attempting to control if not eradicate. However, looking more closely, we find that these apparent no-brainers do, in fact, present complicated policy questions.

Stalking the Wild Pathogen: Viral Threats to Modern Humanity

Steve Heilig | Posted 12.01.2012 | Healthy Living
Steve Heilig

Writers and filmmakers have long liked apocalyptic stories. But out in the real world, it might well be that the most likely cause of our specie's demise will be a microscopic bug we cannot defeat, and that we vanish, or vastly diminish, not with a bang but a whimper.

How Infectious Would a Contagion Have To Be To Cause a Serious Zombie Pandemic?

Quora | Posted 10.15.2012 | Science
Quora

This question originally appeared on Quora. By Robyn Correll Carlyle, MPH There are several factors that determine how quickly a zombie disease wo...

Patient Zero: Why Health Care for All, Via a Nationalized Single-payer System, Is a National Security Issue

Scott Mendelson | Posted 08.29.2012 | Politics
Scott Mendelson

So now that the Affordable Care Act is set in stone, the next step is the provision contained which allows individual states to choose how best to implement the law.

Andrea Stone

Scientist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Says U.S. Is Unprepared For Bioterrorism

HuffingtonPost.com | Andrea Stone | Posted 02.06.2012 | Politics

One of the nation's preeminent scientists is speaking out for the first time about what he says is the government's failure to coordinate preparations...

Sorry, But Bird Flu Bioterrorism Is Much Harder Than It Sounds

Scott Thill | Posted 03.25.2012 | Science
Scott Thill

It may be more of an existential threat than current global pandemics like AIDS or climate change, but it doesn't make it a workable bioweapon.

Lynne Peeples

Flu Pandemics May Be Linked To Weather Patterns, Researchers Say

HuffingtonPost.com | Lynne Peeples | Posted 01.17.2012 | Green

A shifting global climate pattern could portend a flu pandemic, and possibly an opportunity to stop the virus early, a study suggests. The link, a...

The Viral Storm

Nathan Wolfe | Posted 03.11.2012 | Science
Nathan Wolfe

Everyone recognizes the raw power that pandemics have to sweep through human populations and seemingly kill indiscriminately. Yet, given the importance of these events, large questions remain remarkably opaque.