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Passenger Pigeon

The Year of the Passenger Pigeon

Errol Fuller | Posted 12.14.2014 | World
Errol Fuller

The year of the Passenger Pigeon is fast coming to its end and the publicity generated by a variety of focus groups has resulted in the species becoming almost as familiar an icon of extinction as the Dodo.

An Abundance of Loss With the Loss of Abundance

Steve Zack | Posted 11.09.2014 | Green
Steve Zack

We need a conservation ethos that embraces the importance of common and abundant species and the roles they play in nature, and to ensure that their abundance continues to inspire and engage us.

People and Other Animals: Remembering an Extinct Species

Ken White | Posted 11.05.2014 | San Francisco
Ken White

Back in March I wrote about extinction, specifically about extinction resulting from the hand of Homo sapiens, focusing then on how man's appetite for...

The Passenger Pigeon, A Requiem

Carl Safina | Posted 11.02.2014 | Green
Carl Safina

As I think of what we are doing to elephants, coral reefs, Bluefin tuna, the great apes and the great cats, today on this sad centennial I wonder whether humanity ever really learned the lesson of the passenger pigeon.

Dearly Beloved: 100 Years Ago the Last Passenger Pigeon Died

Jarid Manos | Posted 10.30.2014 | Black Voices
Jarid Manos

A hundred years ago, Martha died. At 1 p.m. on September 1, 1914, the last individual of a wild blue dove whose flocks once numbered billions and blackened the American skies for days fell over dead in her Cincinnati zoo cage.

The Passenger Pigeon's Everlasting Mark: America's Most Infamous Extinction

Jamie Rappaport Clark | Posted 10.25.2014 | Green
Jamie Rappaport Clark

We rarely know the exact date and time an entire species goes extinct, but in the case of the passenger pigeon, we do. Martha, the very last of her species, took her final breath at the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1st 1914, marking the end of a species that was once the most abundant in North America. This was America's first infamous extinction.

The Overlooked Anniversary: 40 Years Ago Congress and the President Called for a Steady State Economy

Brian Czech | Posted 10.04.2014 | Politics
Brian Czech

Pursuant to an act of the 93rd Congress, President Richard M. Nixon signed into law the establishment of a steady state economy. That law was called the Endangered Species Act.

DNA Study Reveals Surprising Truth About Bird's Extinction

| Sarah C. P. Williams | Posted 06.17.2014 | Science

When the last passenger pigeon died at a zoo in 1914, the species became a cautionary tale of the dramatic impact humans can have on the world. But a...

Extinction at the Hand of Man

Ken White | Posted 05.25.2014 | San Francisco
Ken White

As someone who lives in the Bay Area, it's almost always on trips away from home when I find myself bumping into people who deny (a) that there's clim...

Is Extinction Forever? Or Is the Passenger Pigeon Waiting in the Wings?

Steve Zack | Posted 12.08.2013 | Green
Steve Zack

It is probably the most dramatic extinction story ever witnessed. Yet now there is interest and even the possibility of bringing the most famously extinct bird back.

Debate Over 'De-Extinction' Heats Up

LiveScience | Tanya Lewis | Posted 08.26.2013 | Science

The passenger pigeon, the dodo and the woolly mammoth are just a few of the species wiped off the Earth by changing environments and human activities...

The Man Box and The Cult of Masculinity

V-Day | Posted 04.13.2013 | World
V-Day

Violence doesn't happen in a vacuum. To address and to end violence against women globally, we must consider the factors and circumstances that contr...

Observations from the World Conservation Congress: A Pigeon That Was a Canary

Dr. Cristián Samper | Posted 11.11.2012 | Green
Dr. Cristián Samper

As I navigate more than 500 events taking place these first two weeks in September at the World Conservation Congress in Jeju, Republic of Korea, a passenger pigeon named Martha who died nearly 100 years ago in Ohio is on my mind.