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Science Research

The Business of Science: Social Networking of Science

Olivier Dumon | Posted 04.06.2014 | Science
Olivier Dumon

The basic premise of social networks -- allowing users to build a custom group of friends and colleagues with whom you can choose to selectively interact -- is its broad appeal. But this premise has, in fact, been around for many decades in science research.

How Your Body Responds to This Image May Predict Your Political Views: Surprising New Explanations for Political Differences

John R. Hibbing | Posted 03.12.2014 | Science
John R. Hibbing

Where people sit socioculturally often does not indicate where they stand politically. But maybe their biology does.

Helping Science to Get It Right

Olivier Dumon | Posted 02.08.2014 | Business
Olivier Dumon

On December 10 the scientific world honors its own in an elaborate ceremony as the Nobel Prizes are awarded. Unlike Hollywood's big night, there's no ...

The Next Frontier in the Business of Science: Improving Mental Health

Olivier Dumon | Posted 09.09.2013 | Science
Olivier Dumon

If a cure, and ultimately a prevention, for such disorders as schizophrenia, autism or Alzheimer's can be developed in our lifetime, it will save trillions of dollars in medical and patient-care costs and a lifetime of family heartaches.

Sam Stein

Sequestration Means Less Science

HuffingtonPost.com | Sam Stein | Posted 05.10.2013 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- When politicians talk about the need to maintain America as the destination for the best and the brightest in science, they probably hav...

Sam Stein

Sequestration Forces Doctors To Scale Back Promising Medical Research

HuffingtonPost.com | Sam Stein | Posted 05.03.2013 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- At Temple University in Philadelphia, a group of 22 graduate students and researchers have been exploring ways to help repair the heart ...

Running the Business of Science

Olivier Dumon | Posted 06.26.2013 | Science
Olivier Dumon

Just like any other business, the way science gets done has undergone a rapid transformation in the past 30 years, especially in the context of the Internet revolution.

UC Postdoctoral Researchers Deserve Equal Pay for Equal Work

Neal Sweeney | Posted 06.03.2013 | College
Neal Sweeney

Imagine the surprise of students on guest worker visas when, after arriving at UC, they are told that although the contract the union negotiated states that health care coverage is available to all postdocs, it will not be extended to them.

A Big Hole Where a Cliff Used to Be

William T. Talman, MD | Posted 01.22.2013 | Science
William T. Talman, MD

Federal funding for research is neither a gift nor a handout to scientists. Instead, it is an investment that pays dividends many times over to the American taxpayer. Will our elected leaders cut the very programs that provide greatest benefit both now and into the future?

The Endless Frontier: U.S. Science and National Industrial Policy (Part 1)

Steve Blank | Posted 03.17.2013 | Business
Steve Blank

The U.S. has spent the last 70 years making massive investments in basic and applied research. The irony is that while the U.S. government has had a robust national science and technology policy, it lacks a national industrial policy.

How the Internet Changed Science Research and Academic Publishing, Creating the New Research Economy

Olivier Dumon | Posted 03.05.2013 | Science
Olivier Dumon

Scientists and engineers representing a wide variety of cross-disciplines can debate research findings in online forums, and society will ultimately benefit from the resulting scientific discourse that will open up limitless new avenues for search and discovery.

PCAST Report: The Future of U.S. Research

James M. Gentile | Posted 02.18.2013 | Science
James M. Gentile

Increased and predictable funding and incentives for research and development are essential, as is a workforce skilled at filling the resulting jobs. But it's also important that America's approach to research shift from safe and incremental research to the "high-risk, high-reward" research.

Back to Basics

William T. Talman, MD | Posted 12.29.2012 | Science
William T. Talman, MD

Did you ever consider why the thing scientists do is called "research"? Where did the "re" come from? If it derives from "repeat," as some might suggest, then it is no surprise that the answer to that question really defines why science is what it is.

For Science, a Consequential Election

Jonathan D. Moreno | Posted 12.24.2012 | Politics
Jonathan D. Moreno

Underlying the Romney-Ryan agenda is a fundamental mistrust of the power of modern biology, of which stem cell research is but a symbol.

'Single Gene May Hold Key to Life Itself'

Nathaniel Comfort | Posted 11.23.2012 | Science
Nathaniel Comfort

Distortions and sensationalism really only explain how deterministic stories persist -- not why. There must be something satisfying and lucrative about "gene-for" stories. What is so sexy about a gene for IQ?

Accepting the Challenge of Continued U.S. Science Leadership

James M. Gentile | Posted 11.12.2012 | Science
James M. Gentile

Research Corporation for Science Advancement pledges to work aggressively to rally our academic colleagues, sister foundations, and other like-minded organizations for a frontal assault on the current stumbling blocks impeding the production of more top-quality science and scientists.

I Owe It All to Science

Soyeun Yang | Posted 11.10.2012 | College
Soyeun Yang

Through the other participants and the sights we saw, my eyes were opened to how vast the world really was, yet how some things remain universal -- one of them being people and another being science.

A Biologist and a Chemist Walk Into a Bar...

Meera Bhanu | Posted 08.26.2012 | Science
Meera Bhanu

Life as a researcher is no walk in the park, but a passion for science (along with ample amounts of perseverance) can go a long way. We might look like geeks, but it's good to know that the producers of The Big Bang Theory have got our backs!

This Is What Pure Joy Looks Like! (WATCH)

The Huffington Post | Posted 06.22.2012 | Teen

Last month, 15-year-old Jack Andraka won first place at the world's largest high school science research competition, the Intel Science and Engineerin...

Congress Could Deal Death Blow to American Scientific Exceptionalism

Robert Forrest | Posted 08.18.2012 | Politics
Robert Forrest

The pattern of polarizing rhetoric and inability to compromise is sure to continue. However, both Democratic and Republican voters should insist their leaders act and agree to maintain funding for scientific research and development.

The Health of Science

Dr. Arturo Casadevall | Posted 07.29.2012 | Science
Dr. Arturo Casadevall

We call for nothing short of a major reformation of the scientific enterprise.

We Need a Crash Course in Citizen Science

Stuart Firestein | Posted 05.11.2012 | Science
Stuart Firestein

So what is the way in? How do we get to appreciate and understand and participate in science without having to collect a few PhDs? Though it may seem a curious perspective, I suggest ignorance.

Check This Box: Science Is Getting Easier/Harder/Both/Neither?

Jonathan D. Moreno | Posted 06.06.2012 | Science
Jonathan D. Moreno

We seem to be in a transition period from a marvelously rich era of discovery in the last thirty years to an era in which new concepts and methods will be required to gain access to another range of powerful discoveries.

Super Committee Fail Jeopardizes Science Research

Neal Sweeney | Posted 01.31.2012 | San Francisco
Neal Sweeney

In spite of the great benefits of the U.S.'s long-standing commitment to basic science research and the breakthroughs it has enabled, Congress stands poised to undermine this cornerstone of American economic competitiveness.

Our Challenge: Motivating the Next 'Joe Montanas' in Science and Engineering

Larry Bock | Posted 11.08.2011 | Impact
Larry Bock

As sure as football rules in autumn, motivating and educating the next generation of innovators is a competition we cannot afford to lose.