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The Best of Channel Surfing on YouTube: Week of February 4, 2013

Shira Lazar | Posted 04.07.2013 | Technology
Shira Lazar

Each Monday on Channel Surfing, What's Trending quickly flips through the best of what's happening around YouTube and serves it up for your viewing pleasure.

Cara Santa Maria

WATCH: Why Does Sadness Make Us Cry?

HuffingtonPost.com | Cara Santa Maria | Posted 02.04.2013 | Science

We're all too familiar with tears welling up in our eyes--brought on by stress, sadness, or even laughter. But why exactly does feeling things make li...

Are We All Just Wired for Anxiety?

Ben Michaelis, Ph.D. | Posted 04.05.2013 | Home
Ben Michaelis, Ph.D.

If Shermer is right (and he is), and that our default setting is to see patterns where they don't exist because the cost of being wrong (that there is no pattern) is usually much higher than the cost of being right (that there is a pattern) then I have some bad news for you.

Abortion Bill Contains Interesting Ban

The Huffington Post | John Celock | Posted 02.03.2013 | Politics

A Republican state legislator in Mississippi has proposed a ban on human-animal hybrids. State Rep. William Tracy Arnold (R-Booneville) proposed t...

Girls In STEM: 2013 Mentorship Resources And Updates

Brittany Binowski | Posted 10.01.2013 | Technology
Brittany Binowski

Editor's Note: This post is part of a series produced by HuffPost's Girls In STEM Mentorship Program. Join the community as we discuss issues affectin...

What Is Skepticism, Anyway?

Michael Shermer | Posted 04.03.2013 | Home
Michael Shermer

2013-02-01-shermerpullI am often asked what I mean by skepticism, and if I'm skeptical of everything or if I actually believe anything. There is also a popular notion that skeptics are closed-minded.

Understanding Health Myths, Presumptions and Facts

Rachele M. Pojednic, Ed.M, M.S. | Posted 04.02.2013 | Healthy Living
Rachele M. Pojednic, Ed.M, M.S.

In the scientific world, we live by the tenet "association does not assume causation." That is, just because two things happen to be related, does not mean that one caused the other.

Communicating Science, Caveman Style

David Rejeski | Posted 04.02.2013 | Science
David Rejeski

The headline in the Britain's Daily Mail tabloid was hard to miss: "Wanted: Adventurous Woman to Give Birth to Neanderthal Man, Harvard Professor seeks Mother for Cloned Cave Baby."

Miracle Pills and Muscle Drills: How to Train Your Brain to Think Healthy

Ben Thomas | Posted 04.02.2013 | Science
Ben Thomas

Could our national obsession with quick fixes, one-step cures and bullet-pointed tips be distracting us from making long-term commitments to health?

On The Fringe Of Reality

Mark Boslough | Posted 04.04.2013 | Home
Mark Boslough

In our daily lives, there often seem to be just enough ants, raindrops, and clouds for us to discern patterns, but not enough to be certain or to know what they mean.

Alaska Scientists Discover Remains of 40,000-Year-Old Extinct Bison

Alaska Dispatch News | Posted 03.30.2013 | Science
Alaska Dispatch News

As she scraped cold dirt from the remains of an extinct bison, Pam Groves wrinkled her nose at a rotten-egg smell wafting from gristle that still clun...

Great Mathematical Problems

Ian Stewart | Posted 03.30.2013 | Science
Ian Stewart

Great mathematical problems sometimes arise from questions about the natural world, but more often they emerge because gaps appear in our mathematical knowledge.

Easy Homemade Yogurt With Bananas Foster

Kathy Carter Woods | Posted 03.30.2013 | Taste
Kathy Carter Woods

I'd been wanting to make homemade yogurt for years. After much trial and error, I finally figured it out and found the perfect recipe for me: a small batch of unsweetened yogurt.

Can Insects Smell Food from Hundreds of Meters Away?

Quora | Posted 03.30.2013 | Science
Quora

This question originally appeared on Quora. Answer by Matan Shelomi, Entomologist Within a hundred meters seems likely. That seems to be the limit...

'Discoverers on an Old Sphere'

Zoe P. Strassfield | Posted 03.29.2013 | Science
Zoe P. Strassfield

One of the hardest parts of preparing an article, and I think most writers will agree with me here, is getting the beginning just right. What's the right "point of entry" to the subject being discussed? What aspect of it should you address first?

How to Stick to Your Resolutions by Hacking Your Brain

Ben Thomas | Posted 03.27.2013 | Science
Ben Thomas

Whether you keep a "Win Journal" or just a photo album, your story will serve as a constant reminder of what you're capable of and inspire you to shoot even higher in the future. The more you reshape your expectations of yourself, the more you'll find yourself sticking to your goals.

Scientists Prove That Internet Trolls Are Wicked

Richard Schiffman | Posted 03.27.2013 | Media
Richard Schiffman

One rule of thumb is that trolls pretend to be sincerely interested in a topic at hand -- that's how they rope you in -- but their real motive is to push your neural buttons and elicit some sort of reaction.

Have You Hugged Your Whistleblower Today? They Could Use It

Jerry Ashton | Posted 01.25.2013 | Business
Jerry Ashton

If you think the legendary "thin blue line" is stressful, you should try walking the "thin gray line" of the Whistleblower, who protect us from the insidious and frightening dangers of corporate and government miscreants.

It's the Right Time for Congress to Recognize Darwin

Roy Speckhardt | Posted 03.26.2013 | Science
Roy Speckhardt

Unfortunately, many politicians in America are gripped by an anti-science fervor. That's why it is so important that humanists were able to work with Rep. Rush Holt on a Darwin Day resolution, which was just introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Science's Sacred Cows (Part 3): Determinism

Dave Pruett | Posted 03.25.2013 | Science
Dave Pruett

Today we ring the death knell for determinism, the collateral damage of two revolutionary scientific developments of the 20th century. Let's review them in reverse historical order.

Sustainable Agriculture, Wilderness and Drakes Bay Oysters: The Role of Science in Policy

Peter H. Gleick | Posted 01.23.2013 | Science
Peter H. Gleick

Scientific integrity, logic, reason and the scientific method are core to the strength of our nation. We may disagree about matters of opinion and policy, but we (and our elected representatives) must not misuse, hide or misrepresent science in service of our preferences and ideology.

You Matter: The Two Most Important Words to Motivate Women in STEM

Angela Maiers | Posted 12.09.2013 | Impact
Angela Maiers

When we tell a young woman that she matters, we are inviting her into a life of service and action. Leadership is hard work and it comes with real responsibility. We help young leaders grow when we give them both, by telling them that they matter, and are accountable for it.

Unexpected DNA Discovery May Aid Cancer Research

The Huffington Post | Dominique Mosbergen | Posted 01.25.2013 | Science

Sixty years after Watson and Crick first described the two-stranded "double helix" structure of DNA, scientists at the University of Cambridge now rep...

'Doomsday Clock' Set For 2013

Posted 01.18.2013 | Science

The Internet is abuzz with news of the 2013 "Doomsday Clock," as alarmed netizens scramble to learn what this apocalyptic time-keeper is and what it m...

Where Are the Women Speakers on Expert Panels, and Does It Matter?

Dr Layla McCay | Posted 03.18.2013 | Business
Dr Layla McCay

I have been the only women on several panels; perhaps even felt like the token one. I don't know whether a pledge/boycott approach to drive more women onto panels is the right thing to do, but it does draw attention to a glass ceiling issue that needs to be addressed.