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Scientific Research

Insights Are in Cite: Tracking Science's Hottest and Emerging Fields

Christopher King | Posted 12.16.2014 | Science
Christopher King

These days, with scientific knowledge proliferating so rapidly and in such a seemingly undifferentiated torrent, how can one hope to mark the genesis of new areas of specialized investigation?

The Power of the Crowd: Using Crowdfunding to Raise Research Dollars

Lynn E. Fiellin | Posted 12.03.2014 | Science
Lynn E. Fiellin

For crowdfunding for scientific research to be effective, efficient and most importantly, sustainable, the power of the crowd must be additive to continued (and hopefully increasing) federal funding sources, not as a substitute.

Children of Color and Autism: Too Little, Too Late

Areva Martin | Posted 11.11.2014 | Black Voices
Areva Martin

As the incidence rate of autism continues to grow, institutions and scientists are missing an incredible opportunity to study a unique and distinct demographic of the autism community: children of color. Not only does this complicate any mission of advancing the science of autism overall, but it perpetuates health disparities for African-American children with autism.

World's Most Innovative Companies

Christopher King | Posted 11.07.2014 | Business
Christopher King

Asia declares a new primacy on the list, particularly with Japanese firms and, perhaps most notable of all, the first China-based company to make the annual ranking. Concurrently, some traditional powers, including the United States and France, have ceded representation among the Top 100.

Science's Top Papers: The Tools of the Trade

Christopher King | Posted 11.04.2014 | Science
Christopher King

For scientists and scholars toiling at their research and publishing their findings, the most immediate reward from the scientific community is a citation, when fellow researchers read their work and include it among the footnotes of a newly published paper.

Increased Public Awareness Sparks Surge in Traumatic Brain Injury Research

Christopher King | Posted 10.30.2014 | Science
Christopher King

Between the battlefield and the athletic field, the topic of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been much in the news in recent years.

Despite Headlines, Ebola Doesn't Yet Register Strongly in the Scientific Literature

Christopher King | Posted 11.18.2014 | Science
Christopher King

The crisis of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, at this writing, continues to deepen, with the World Health Organization now reporting more than 3,600 cases, and deaths exceeding 1,800. And yet, despite the headlines and the notes of alarm, Ebola as a research topic remains a comparatively limited presence in the scientific literature.

Have Social Media Researchers Taken Permanent Leave of their Senses?

Ed Hamilton | Posted 10.14.2014 | Technology
Ed Hamilton

In other words, the ethics of scientific research remain unchanged: you still need to get the subject's informed consent.

Science Academy Falters in Launch of New GE Study

Dr. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman | Posted 10.12.2014 | Green
Dr. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman

As I looked over the bios provided on NRC's webpage, I quickly realized that the Council appears to have a pretty poor idea of how to carry out such a challenging, complex and multifaceted study. In fact, this week 67 scientists and researchers publicly rebuked the NRC for failing, right at the outset, to put together a slate of experts equipped for the task.

How Producing Art Can Keep Our Brains Functioning

The Huffington Post | Katherine Brooks | Posted 07.10.2014 | Arts

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life," so Pablo Picasso once famously proclaimed. Though we expect the pompous Cubist was being ...

Science's Most Influential Researchers

Christopher King | Posted 08.25.2014 | Science
Christopher King

The Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters has released a new report, "The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014," a listing of authors who have written multiple highly cited reports and have thereby demonstrated that their work is central to ongoing research in their respective fields.

Why Science? An Unemotional Argument for Federal Investment in Research

William H. Press | Posted 08.20.2014 | Science
William H. Press

How did we become the world's leading economy and one of its wealthiest nations per capita? One critical reason is that the U.S. has always invested in innovation. We spend more than any other country on R&D. Has this spending made us richer? The clear answer comes from a long run of economists who have studied this subject intensively. Here is what they have learned.

A New Way of Thinking About Autoimmune Disease

Dr. Denise Nagel | Posted 08.04.2014 | Healthy Living
Dr. Denise Nagel

We don't have to choose Eastern or Western -- just what is effective. Now we have a demonstrated scientific underpinning linking the two.

What's Better: Exercising More Or Sitting Less?

Mike Sheridan | Posted 08.01.2014 | Healthy Living
Mike Sheridan

There's no doubt we can all make an effort to increase our standing or walking outside of the hours we're expected to sit.

The Science Citation Index: A Transformative Information Resource Turns 50

Christopher King | Posted 07.16.2014 | Science
Christopher King

In an age when all the world's knowledge seems to be at one's fingertips, it might be difficult to envision a bygone era when retrieving information meant a slow, laborious, manual slog through printed materials. For scientists and scholars in the 1950s, the task was especially arduous.

Who's Afraid of the Big Definitive Book?: Scott Stossel's My Age of Anxiety

Liam Smith | Posted 07.14.2014 | Books
Liam Smith

Over the course of the 400-plus page book, Stossel outlines every aspect of the subject of anxiety imaginable. His focus shifts between history of thought on the subject, descriptions of scientific experiments and research, and his own phenomenological experience of dealing with the condition.

Science Is Not a Popularity Contest

John Friedman | Posted 07.14.2014 | Science
John Friedman

The interesting thing about science is that it is not about public opinion or even popular consensus. Scientific discoveries, even those that are unpopular, have a history of being borne out over time.

Will Medical Innovation Be an Afterthought This Election Season?

Mary Woolley | Posted 06.24.2014 | Politics
Mary Woolley

Government investment in research is necessary. We cannot rely on the private sector to fill the void as elected officials cut agency budgets as part of an ill-advised attempt to reduce the deficit. Even if all science agencies were eliminated, we would not put a significant dent in the deficit.

Lurking Truth in Recent Studies

David H. Newman, M.D. | Posted 06.09.2014 | Science
David H. Newman, M.D.

Last month a study of siblings found that breastfeeding conferred no health advantages, while a second study declared older paternal age to be associated with psychiatric problems in children. A third study found no link between saturated fats and heart disease. It was a month of unexpected, and sometimes unsettling, science.

A Kerfuffle Among Friends and Family in the House of Bi

Gary North | Posted 06.07.2014 | Gay Voices
Gary North

Once upon a time, when the bi world was young (1987-1990 or so) and some of us were a bit younger, all the American bi activists seemed to know each other.

The Business of Search and Discovery

Olivier Dumon | Posted 06.02.2014 | Science
Olivier Dumon

Scholarly publishers can, and do, match content to researchers leveraging the user, usage and social signals as part of our professional responsibility to advance science. Researchers have the responsibility of their profession to weigh its benefits against the liability of the privacy tradeoff.

Mind Games: Surprising News About ADHD Medication

Donna Wick, Ed.D | Posted 05.25.2014 | Healthy Living
Donna Wick, Ed.D

Note: This post has been revised since its original publication. My oldest daughter was diagnosed with ADD over 10 years ago, as the result of a co...

Sugar Kills! How Do We Decrease Consumption?

Jeff Ritterman, MD | Posted 05.20.2014 | Healthy Living
Jeff Ritterman, MD

Our advice could be simple: "Eat real food. If they advertise it, don't buy it." The explanation simple as well: They advertise food and beverages because they want you to eat and drink products that are unhealthy."

Mega-Collaborations: How Big Teams Can Work Together

Annie Murphy Paul | Posted 05.04.2014 | Business
Annie Murphy Paul

If you've ever been a part of a team in a workplace, you know that coordinating with even a single other person can quickly get, well, complicated. Now imagine having hundreds, even thousands of "teammates," all with a hand in the same project.

On Darwin Day, We Honor Science and Scientists

Roy Speckhardt | Posted 03.31.2014 | Science
Roy Speckhardt

This year's celebration is especially meaningful given the numerous legislative threats that the scientific community faces and the lackluster level of government funding of scientific research.