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Shakespeare

Beliebing in Stratford, Ontario

Malerie Yolen-Cohen | Posted 08.07.2013 | Travel
Malerie Yolen-Cohen

Whether you're into Bieber or the Bard, if you are a Chocoholic, batty for bacon, or if you just love to eat good food and see first-rate theater, Stratford, Ontario is one fun Getaway.

A Double Dose Of Rylance

AP | MARK KENNEDY | Posted 06.06.2013 | Arts

NEW YORK -- Broadway will get a double dose of Mark Rylance this winter – the two-time Tony Award-winning English actor will alternate between s...

A World Divided: Tracing the Origins of Matt Sax and Eric Rosen's Venice

Shoshana Greenberg | Posted 07.28.2013 | Arts
Shoshana Greenberg

Matt Sax and Eric Rosen's version of Venice does not have canals or gondolas. It's not an ancient city in Italy or even a California beach. It's a city in ruins. A terrorist attack has led to a 20-year military occupation, and the citizens are on the brink of revolution.

Bringing Shakesy Back: New York Shakespeare Exchange's Sonnet Project

Bess Rowen | Posted 07.22.2013 | Arts
Bess Rowen

Theater does not begin with the raising of a curtain, nor does it end with that curtain's fall. Those of us who believe in the power of theater and pe...

'No One Ever Told Me It Would Be Like This'

Myra Evans | Posted 07.22.2013 | Parents
Myra Evans

I tried to hear what was wrong in between the sobs, but she only managed to get a few words out between the tears. She was gasping for air. My heart sank. I had 12 trustees waiting for me to finish a presentation on a $1 billion asset allocation strategy.

English Soccer and the Scots

Alan Black | Posted 07.10.2013 | Sports
Alan Black

This is how it went -- one wet day, in the 19th century, the English crossed the border for a game of footie and were shocked to see Scots making a pass. They left bewildered and shocked, sending them home to think again, and to pretend that they invented soccer.

Learning From Shakespeare

Bruce Fein | Posted 07.07.2013 | Politics
Bruce Fein

Muslim antagonism towards the United States would not have awakened if we had refrained from material military, economic, or diplomatic assistance in favor of oppressive Muslim regimes.

Natalie Portman To Take On Iconic Villain

Posted 05.01.2013 | Entertainment

What's done is done -- and, in this case, we love it. Natalie Portman is set to play Lady Macbeth opposite Michael Fassbender's Macbeth in a recen...

Sister Acts

George Heymont | Posted 06.30.2013 | Arts
George Heymont

Anyone who has been an avid theatergoer over the past two decades knows that the traditional three-act play has become an endangered species. More and more, one encounters one-act plays designed to be performed by two actors.

Michele Bachmann Fumbles Famous Line

The Huffington Post | Lisa_Miller | Posted 04.26.2013 | Politics

While speaking on the House floor Friday, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) tried to impress her colleagues by pulling out a famous quotation, but inste...

America Feels Big This Morning, Hitchhiking Across

Michael Sean Comerford | Posted 06.23.2013 | Fifty
Michael Sean Comerford

I've just turned 54, and I'm hitchhiking from metro San Francisco to the East Coast. I don't know exactly where I'm going, but I'll be looking for carnival work along the way.

Theater: Nathan Lane Kills, Alan Cumming Bores, Deborah Cox Delights And More....

Michael Giltz | Posted 06.23.2013 | Arts
Michael Giltz

An excitingly ambitious new play by Douglas Carter Beane, The Nance is held back only by some poor casting and a modest lack of context. But it's essential theater for anyone who wants to see Nathan Lane -- one of the greats -- at the top of his game.

WATCH: The 'Romeo & Juliet' Fish Tank Scene Gets Us Every Time

The Huffington Post | Rebecca Adams | Posted 04.23.2013 | Style

Few movie scenes render us as useless as the fish tank moment in the 1996 version of "Romeo + Juliet." Just one look at Leonardo DiCaprio smiling at C...

Perception and Imagination

Brian D. Cohen | Posted 06.22.2013 | Arts
Brian D. Cohen

Everything we need to know about love and pain is in Chagall and Gorky. That the feeling that a painting evokes is communicated by its form, color, shapes, and marks, is self-evident and explicable.

The Faerie Month of May: Faerie Festivals and May Celebrations

Stephen D. Winick | Posted 06.20.2013 | Arts
Stephen D. Winick

Today's Maytime Faerie Festivals, including Spoutwood Farm's May Day Fairie Festival, the Maryland Faerie Festival, and the New York Faerie Festival, are outgrowths of this vibrant May tradition. They feature kings and queens, Maypole dances, flower garlands and beautiful costumes.

Stopping to Smell the Bermuda Cedar

Mike Dunphy | Posted 06.11.2013 | Travel
Mike Dunphy

Going "native" in Bermuda doesn't just mean sucking up the clear white sunlight and azure ocean breezes, but also the cedar itself. It's not the sun almondizing the skin of long term residents, it's the cedar.

Onstage: Paul Giamatti in Hamlet

Marshall Fine | Posted 06.10.2013 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

It's that rare evening of theater where something that was already familiar becomes new, yielding unexpected meaning and feelings.

Complete Works of William Shakespeare in One Weekend - An Interview With Company's Marathon 2013 Producer Winnie Lok

Carey Purcell | Posted 06.08.2013 | Arts
Carey Purcell

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare in 90 minutes is one thing, while the Complete Works of William Shakespeare in one weekend is entirely another. But that is exactly what Company's Marathon 2013 is bringing.

Celebrate Poetry Month: Dream of Your Dreams

Terry Blackhawk | Posted 06.01.2013 | Detroit
Terry Blackhawk

It must be no accident that National Poetry Month starts on April 1st, because what are poems but a fine foolery, or a fine frenzy as Theseus would have it, in Act V of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Study Reveals Shocking Truth About Shakespeare

AP | JILL LAWLESS | Posted 05.31.2013 | Business

LONDON — Hoarder, moneylender, tax dodger – it's not how we usually think of William Shakespeare. But we should, according to a group of ...

Lantern Theater's Henry V Brushes Up Our Shakespeare

Lew Whittington | Posted 05.28.2013 | Arts
Lew Whittington

This play, is indeed cinematic in scope. 450 years later, the modestly equipped Lantern Theater and director Charles McMahon solve any issues of scale, with kinetic and fully engaged stagecraft. Theirs is nothing less than an intimate epic.

Richard III Reportedly Rolling Over

Tony Phillips | Posted 05.27.2013 | Comedy
Tony Phillips

It doesn't really matter who an American is descended from. We're all mixed breed yokels anyhow. But breeding matters to the English. They have aristocrats. A family of note is no less notable 500 years after it ceased to matter. No sir.

Iraq, Stalingrad, Gettysburg and the Limits of Remembrance

Franz-Stefan Gady | Posted 05.21.2013 | Politics
Franz-Stefan Gady

Anniversaries show us the eventual futility and limits of human remembrance -- especially when it comes to tragic political events like wars and battles. 2013 marks a striking confluence of martial anniversaries.

Love, Death and Pennies: John Green on The Interview Show

Mark Bazer | Posted 05.19.2013 | Entertainment
Mark Bazer

Green talks hating pennies, loving the world and everything in between. Please, please excuse the continual screwing up of the title of "The Two Gentlemen of Verona."

Goodman's Robert Falls Talks Shakespeare, Brian Dennehy ... and Ron Jeremy on The Interview Show

Mark Bazer | Posted 05.12.2013 | Chicago
Mark Bazer

Robert Falls, the Artistic Director for the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, stopped by The Interview Show to talk with me about his new production of Measure for Measure, why Shakespeare is usually boring, how to direct Brian Dennehy, and lots more.