iOS app Android app

Social Perception

Apparently, We're All A Little Bit Face-ist

The Huffington Post | Macrina Cooper-White | Posted 10.23.2014 | Science

Seems everyone's a little bit "face-ist," sometimes. That is, we make subtle and essentially irrational judgments about people based on their facial f...

Redskin Psychology: The Origins of Cruel Caricatures

Wray Herbert | Posted 08.11.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

My hometown football team has been under fire for many years for using the derogatory term "redskin" as its team mascot. As it should. Indeed, the stereotype existed long before the football team -- even before football. But where and how do such mean-spirited and distorted caricatures get started?

Why 'Occupy Wall Street' Fizzled

Wray Herbert | Posted 09.29.2013 | Science
Wray Herbert

Perceived consensus -- even if it's just a perception -- can motivate a movement's rank and file to embrace social change and stay focused. By contrast, the desire for uniqueness can undermine individuals' ability to capitalize on whatever consensus actually exists.

Calling a Bluff: Is It All in the Arms?

Wray Herbert | Posted 06.09.2013 | Science
Wray Herbert

We all know the expression "poker face" because the face is where we expect to find meaningful information. But what if poker players are looking in the wrong place?

How To Defuse A Hateful Slur

Wray Herbert | Posted 05.08.2013 | Science
Wray Herbert

Now we have a psychological explanation for this counterintuitive phenomenon of self-labeling. It all has to do with power, and perceptions of power, in society.

What's in a Name?

Sam Sommers | Posted 09.15.2012 | Home
Sam Sommers

Names matter. Whenever we hear one, we draw a wide range of assumptions about the individual person (or item) in question. Just ask the fish merchant whose stroke of naming genius turned the undesirable Patagonian toothfish into the haute cuisine Chilean sea bass.

Law and Disorder: The Psychology of False Confessions

Wray Herbert | Posted 03.13.2012 | Crime
Wray Herbert

Confessions are powerful and damning evidence, which is a good thing if the defendant is guilty. But what if the defendant is innocent?