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The Lives of Others

The Lives of Others: Lessons Not Learned

K.J. Wetherholt | Posted 04.16.2014 | Politics
K.J. Wetherholt

That history repeats itself is a known truth borne from both philosophical reminders and from experience, for humanity has a way of forgetting its most important lessons, even those from fewer than three decades ago.

Live from the Karlovy Vary Film Festival: Monday, July 1

Marshall Fine | Posted 08.31.2013 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

I feel like a bit of a slacker, having only seen four films Monday at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival. But summer -- kept at bay since Friday by cool...

They Don't Know Everything, My Love... They Don't Know...

Yoani Sanchez | Posted 04.15.2012 | World
Yoani Sanchez

ur watchers, poor guys, have never read the first song you sang me, much less that poem where you said one day we would go to Sydney or Baghdad. Nor will they forgive us every time we escape from them -- without a trace -- on the diastole of a spasm.

25 Foreign Films Even Subtitle Haters Should See

John Farr | Posted 05.31.2013 | Entertainment
John Farr

Reading subtitles is a lot like riding a bicycle. Practice not only makes perfect, soon enough it's second nature so you don't even notice you're doing it. This particularly holds true when you're watching something great.

Movie Review: Little Rose (Rózyczka)

Dan Lybarger | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Dan Lybarger

While it might cover some of the same ground as Donnersmark's The Lives of Others, the new Polish espionage thriller Little Rose is worthy in its own right.

HuffPost Review: The Tourist

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

The Tourist is more like steerage than coach, a tarted-up piece of product that's flat and witless. Hopefully, Henckel von Donnersmarck will go back to making his own films and put Hollywood in his rearview mirror.

A Word To Hollywood: In Recessionary Times, Smaller, Better Films, Please -- And More Of Them!

John Farr | Posted 05.25.2011 | Entertainment
John Farr

This year's gimmicky Benjamin Button cost $150 million, the superlative Milk cost just $15 million. Why not fund ten more Milk-type films and forego one Button?