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World War I

With the Churchills in London

Barry Singer | Posted 12.16.2014 | Arts
Barry Singer

Lo (and behold), I found myself in London last month, standing before The Great Door to St. James Palace at dusk, more or less expecting to be let in. Which I was! Straight off, I took a wrong turn, gravitating toward a bunch of bobbies and a man with a clipboard.

A Farewell to Arms (1929): Giving Thanks...

Joseph Cooper | Posted 11.24.2014 | Books
Joseph Cooper

One wonders how Frederic Henry would handle the job of evacuating wounded from Syria, Iraq, or Afghanistan, 85 years after he was deployed to the World War One Italian front as an ambulance driver, by Ernest Hemingway, in A Farewell to Arms.

In Jerusalem, Recent Violence Is Measured by a Long History

The GroundTruth Project | Posted 11.19.2014 | World
The GroundTruth Project

The "war to end all wars," as the Great War was called, has instead become a war that has never ended. No single city held more emotional and sacred power in the First World War than Jerusalem, a power that still resonates and still stirs conflict.

No Good War, No Bad Peace

Eric Margolis | Posted 11.19.2014 | Politics
Eric Margolis

A full century after World War I we still cannot understand how generals sent so many soldiers to be slaughtered. Ten million soldiers died on all sides; millions more were left maimed or shell shocked. Seven million civilians died. 20 million horses died.

Do Wars Really Defend America's Freedom?

Lawrence Wittner | Posted 11.17.2014 | World
Lawrence Wittner

U.S. politicians and pundits are fond of saying that America's wars have defended America's freedom. But the historical record doesn't bear out this contention. In fact, over the past century, U.S. wars have triggered major encroachments upon civil liberties.

Veteran's Day: Remembering the True Cost

Keith M. Parsons | Posted 11.11.2014 | Impact
Keith M. Parsons

Commemorations are good. It is good to stand with eyes lowered and to hear the bell ring and the bugle sound. The only danger is that in honoring the veterans, both living and dead, we will let our feelings be cheapened into flag-waving sentimentality.

American Journey From Terror to Peace, 9/11 to 11/11

Elizabeth Kucinich | Posted 11.12.2014 | Politics
Elizabeth Kucinich

How do we break the mind-forged bars of fear that presently keep us on the treadmill of war, annihilating our Constitution, eliminating our civil liberties, and dismissing any hope for a domestic economy in which everyone has an opportunity to survive?

Veterans Day: The Mission Must Merit the Sacrifice

William Bradley | Posted 11.10.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

Obama is far too smart a man to remain in denial. And far too smart not to know, for this Veterans Day, the consequences of his decisions with regard to U.S. military and covert interventions around the world.

The End of Shared Sacrifice Set in Stone: Yale As Metaphor

Paul Gunther | Posted 11.10.2014 | Politics
Paul Gunther

It behooves Americans not only to pause and consider their war dead, even if just doing so by pondering the anonymous tale of a single lapidary name, but also to think about a contemporary society where the whole concept of such binding sacrifice is equally dead.

The Force of Soft Power: Pat O'Connor on 'Private Peaceful'

Dan Lybarger | Posted 10.31.2014 | Arts
Dan Lybarger

In promoting his new film adaptation of Private Peaceful, a book by War Horse author Michael Morpugo looks back at a way of life that's long gone with only the slightest hint of sentiment.

Debt Collectors, Social Darwinism and William Jennings Bryan

Don McNay | Posted 10.21.2014 | Business
Don McNay

In the over 90 years since William Jennings Bryan's death, we have seen scores of major atrocities played out with the theory of "survival of the fittest" as a motivating factor. We are also seeing it at every level of business and society.

Why We Need More Military Spending

Jonathan Adelman | Posted 12.10.2014 | Politics
Jonathan Adelman

The isolationism of the United States before 1940 is long gone. The new world of instantaneous communication has destroyed the isolation of Americans from the world. With the end of the post-Cold War era, there are potentially serious future threats to American security.

Can China and America Create a '100 Year Peace' Out of Today's Global Chaos?

Dominique Moisi | Posted 11.29.2014 | World
Dominique Moisi

Something like the "bipolar hegemony" of Great Britain and Russia after 1815 (though other players like Austria, Prussia, and France mattered) could be reconstituted, with the US and China substituting for Great Britain and Russia. This seems to be Henry Kissinger's ultimate dream - a dream that one can glimpse in his latest book, Germanically entitled World Order: Reflections on the Character of Nations and the Course of History.

Paths of Catastrophe

Stefan Szepesi | Posted 11.25.2014 | Travel
Stefan Szepesi

There's always the extravagances of a century of front-line tourism to distract us, such as the jamboree of artifacts, war mannequins and gruesome photographs at the Sanctuary Wood museum.

Cooking Art History: Cooking American

Maite Gomez-Rejon | Posted 09.15.2014 | Taste
Maite Gomez-Rejon

Meatless Mondays and Wheatless Wednesdays were encouraged and many Americans had their first vegetarian meal.

Best of Venice: With Tsili Amos Gitai Explains Survival in a Desperate Universe

E. Nina Rothe | Posted 11.13.2014 | Entertainment
E. Nina Rothe

Among the greatest of teachers, I personally hold Amos Gitai in a top position. His work -- such as his latest masterpiece Tsili -- is insightful, groundbreaking, thought-provoking, strong, full of emotions and always entertaining. The best example of cinema with a conscience.

Best of Venice: Theeb Takes the World by (Sand) Storm

E. Nina Rothe | Posted 11.08.2014 | Entertainment
E. Nina Rothe

Theeb is a jewel, deserving of its Orizzonti Award for Best Director prized to Naji Abu Nowar in Venice and more. But Theeb is also the kind of film that grabs a hold of you and doesn't let go.

Hidden in Plain Sight: Finding and Saving World War I Memorials

National Trust for Historic Preservation | Posted 10.28.2014 | Hawaii
National Trust for Historic Preservation

Written by Mark Levitch, Art Historian and Founder, World War I Memorial Inventory Project Architect John LeRoy Marshall designed the Rosedale World...

ISIS Crisis: Is Obama About to Reverse One of His Worst Decisions?

William Bradley | Posted 08.27.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

President Barack Obama is at last signaling that he may be ready to reverse one of his most foolish and perplexing stances. That is his refusal to strike against ISIS in Syria because it would aid the Assad regime in continuing to exist.

Global Problems Call for Global Solutions

Lawrence Wittner | Posted 10.26.2014 | World
Lawrence Wittner

Sometimes, amid the heated political debate about what should done by the U.S. government in world affairs, a proposal cuts through the TV babble of the supposed experts with a clear, useful suggestion.

7 Fascinating But Forgotten Facts From World War I (NEW BOOK)

Allegra Jordan | Posted 10.26.2014 | Books
Allegra Jordan

American soldiers didn't get condoms; British soldiers didn't get boots.

100th Anniversary of WWI - DOX Front Line Exhibition (PHOTOS)

Olena Kagui | Posted 10.21.2014 | Arts
Olena Kagui

"In 1914 the Great War began... and has lasted ever since." This quote can be found at the DOX Center for Contemporary Art in Prague the capital of the 'heart of Europe.'

A True-Life Love Story: What My Grandparents Taught Me About Devotion

Patricia Crisafulli | Posted 10.22.2014 | Fifty
Patricia Crisafulli

It started with a chance meeting: Richard Donohue Long, a tall, good-looking American soldier from Syracuse, New York, walked down a village street in France, just as Leone Sicre threw open a pair of wooden shutters to shake out a duvet cover. He ducked; she slammed the shutters closed.

Gospel Music: Evangelists and Their Song Leaders

William B. Bradshaw | Posted 10.09.2014 | Religion
William B. Bradshaw

The origin and development of Gospel music goes hand in hand with the history of evangelism in the United States. Dwight L. Moody, an evangelist of the mid-to-late 1800s, was the primary "architect" of a new kind of church music that has become what we now call Gospel Music.

Obama's Irrelevant Air Strikes

William Bradley | Posted 10.09.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

After months of temporizing analysis, President Barack Obama re-engaged militarily in the fading colonial construct known as "Iraq." That he has done so in limited fashion is to be commended, though the air strikes he has ordered so far are mere pinpricks.