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World War I

WWI Liturgy Will Atone For Outbreak Of ‘The Great War'

Religion News Service | Kimberly Winston | Posted 07.27.2014 | Religion

(RNS) Half a world away from Europe, where World War I erupted 100 years ago next week (July 28), Washington National Cathedral will mark the occasion...

World War I Poets: An Interview With Alfred Corn

Jonathan Hobratsch | Posted 07.28.2014 | Books
Jonathan Hobratsch

Therefore, I've decided to focus on the great poets of World War I through an interview with Alfred Corn, a poet equally well-recognized in both America and in the U.K.

Early Animation: The Farmer in the City

Andrew J. Lederer | Posted 07.28.2014 | New York
Andrew J. Lederer

In truth, there are scores of mice in Farmer Al's cartoons (as in other Terrytoons), but they are not mighty. The mightiness is reserved for the more or less human character at their center, not mighty as a character -- he is an oft-besieged man -- but mighty as a star.

The Power of Religion to Restrain Conflict

Henry G. Brinton | Posted 07.23.2014 | Religion
Henry G. Brinton

Even in secular contexts, people of faith can work together to encourage or discourage warfare. As violence has escalated in Israel and Gaza, an international campaign for peace has been launched, involving Jews, Muslims, and Christians.

The Bonus Marchers Anniversary and Veterans in America

Roger Fisk | Posted 07.22.2014 | Politics
Roger Fisk

Veterans and patriotism are almost interchangeable, but peeling away the veneer reveals the conflicted relationship America has with its vets.

For Bastille Day, France Commemorates World War I

AP | SYLVIE CORBET | Posted 07.14.2014 | World

PARIS (AP) — Soldiers carrying the flags of 76 countries marched Monday down the Champs-Elysees in Paris, as France's traditional Bastille Day milit...

On the World War One Centennial, Revisiting the U.S. and Russian "Great War" Experience

David Reynolds | Posted 07.11.2014 | World
David Reynolds

Through our double vision of the two world wars, we learn something about the 20th-century past. We also learn a lot about our 21-century present.

Iraq, Syria, and Today's Other Killfests: The Great War as the Tragic Gift that Keeps on Giving

Doug Bandow | Posted 07.08.2014 | World
Doug Bandow

The morning of June 28, 1914 dawned bright for most Europeans. By sunset a geopolitical cataclysm loomed. World War I demonstrated the importance of saying no. Any of the great powers could have stopped the march toward war. America could have refused to join the parade after it started. The world would have been a better place had one or all done so. Today, Washington is filled with routine proposals for new interventions: bombing campaigns, foreign invasions, and military occupations. Most seem unlikely to trigger a new world war. But a century ago no one expected an assassination in a distant Balkan province to do so either. That is reason enough for Americans to make war truly a last resort.

World War I, Rather Than World War II, Is Key for U.S. Foreign Policy

Ivan Eland | Posted 06.30.2014 | World
Ivan Eland

The 100-year anniversary of the most important event in the 20th century passed recently with predictably scant notice in the American media.

The Man Who Ignited WWI Has A Nephew Who's Still Alive (And Other Crazy Great War Facts)

The Huffington Post | Nick Robins-Early & Michael Maisel | Posted 06.27.2014 | World

A hundred years ago on June 28, a young man named Gavrilo Princip fired at Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie during their visit ...

June 28, 1914: What a Difference a Day Makes

Ross M. Wallenstein | Posted 06.27.2014 | New York
Ross M. Wallenstein

The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand changed the world more dramatically than any other assassination in modern history. Similarly, the death of little Stanley Wallenstein on June 28, 1914 had a direct impact on my family.

Bosnian Serbs Erect Statue Of Man Who Ignited WWI

AP | AIDA CERKEZ | Posted 06.27.2014 | World

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Marking the eve of the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs on Friday unve...

Sarajevo 1914 and New York City 2001: Is It Happening Again?

Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey | Posted 06.26.2014 | World
Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey

Sarajevo 1914 does not appear so distant, at least in terms of rhetoric and inclination to dehumanize the other. But, then perhaps our awareness has been raised to the danger.

If ISIS Is Such a Threat, Why No Air Strikes?

William Bradley | Posted 06.23.2014 | Politics
William Bradley

Have we learned nothing during our adventures in the Middle East and Central Asia?

What the History of the World Wars Can Tell Us About the Deeper Struggles at Work in Iraq

David Woolner | Posted 06.21.2014 | Politics
David Woolner

The tragic events unfolding in Iraq today are not all that dissimilar to what took place in the 1930s and '40s. Once again, we face an extremist ideology that is bent on conquest and has little respect for human life.

Memorial Day Reminder of the Foolishness of War: 150 Years Ago Was Another Blood-Drenched Summer in the Civil War

Doug Bandow | Posted 05.31.2014 | Politics
Doug Bandow

Memorial Day offers an annual remembrance of courage and sacrifice as well as the all-too-frequent foolish and counterproductive effusion of American blood. Most of the conflicts in which so many Americans died were fool's errands, wars which the U.S. should never have fought.

Book Review: A Book About War and Madness

Dan Agin | Posted 05.31.2014 | Books
Dan Agin

Maybe the most powerful modern evidence of human craziness was the First World War, also known as the Great War, a war fought for the sake of myths about heroism and masculinity, the myths promulgated by war makers maybe acting on behalf of profit-seeking munitions makers.

Visiting Sarajevo, Where World War I Began

AP | AIDA CERKEZ | Posted 05.27.2014 | Travel

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — If you find yourself on Ferhadija street behind the old synagogue at noon, close your eyes and listen to the bel...

Portland's International Rose Test Garden Offers An Historic Refuge

AP | CHAD GARLAND | Posted 05.27.2014 | Travel

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Boasting spectacular views of the city skyline and — on a clear day — snow-covered Mount Hood, Portland's International Ro...

Some Corner of a Foreign Field, Part II: British and Commonwealth War Cemeteries on the Looney Front

Mike Arkus | Posted 07.18.2014 | Travel
Mike Arkus

If Rupert Brooke, the British World War I poet whose sonnet The Soldier immortalised the sacrifice made by the hundreds of thousands who fell in 'some...

Iconic War Grave 100 Years On: British and Commonwealth War Cemeteries on the Looney Front, Part I

Mike Arkus | Posted 07.14.2014 | Travel
Mike Arkus

If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England... Thus wrote Rupert Brooke, the famed E...

Weapons of Mass Destruction and the Humanities: How WWI Settled an Earlier Argument About the Value of a Liberal Arts Education

Grant Calder | Posted 07.09.2014 | College
Grant Calder

A hundred years ago, there was also speculation that the liberal arts would go the way of the horse and carriage. Then as now, some believed that higher education should emphasize the technical rather than the humanistic, production over contemplation, and job training in lieu of life training.

The War To End All Wars

Robert Koehler | Posted 07.08.2014 | Politics
Robert Koehler

And the Cold War itself -- this deep, unspoken commitment to mass suicide -- merely went on hold. And now it's back, with the two sides still in command of thousands and thousands of nuclear weapons.

Too Bad Ukraine Didn't Keep Its 2,000 Nuclear Weapons

Blake Fleetwood | Posted 06.30.2014 | Politics
Blake Fleetwood

The U.S. should tone down the rhetoric and concentrate on the core issues for worldwide peace and accept the Crimean reality. The solution will evolve slowly, if we let it.

The Gospel of Service and Fighting Hunger

William Lambers | Posted 06.28.2014 | Impact
William Lambers

Feeding a society is challenge enough, even in peacetime. Droughts or flooding can always interrupt the growing of food. There may be transportation, storage and distribution issues with food. In wartime everything is disrupted.