THE BLOG
02/24/2014 12:19 pm ET Updated Apr 26, 2014

The Secret to a Hopeful Planning Session

Here's the situation: You're sitting in a planning meeting. Your team has brain-dumped a list of great ideas that have been turned into the next wave of initiatives. They're inspiring. They're feasible. They've won the prioritization vote. And you leave the meeting feeling defeated, because you know none of these very good ideas will be implemented.

Here's why: there is too much clutter in the existing system. Today's work leaves little room for new efforts. So any senior team that wants to create a great organization has to get ready for new initiatives by regularly clearing the decks. That way, you and your staff can feel excited and positive about your planning work because something productive will come of it.

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Photo by Jeffrey Anderson

But how do you unclutter cleverly? I decided to ask someone who has been eliminating clutter at a world-class organization for 25 years. His name is Tim Gruner and he's the head horticulturist at Anderson Japanese Gardens, a jewel of a garden tucked away in Rockford, IL and perennially recognized as one of the top Japanese gardens in the world.

When you visit Anderson Japanese Gardens during the warm months, you'll see Tim and his team out in the garden. Most of the time, they're pruning. To you and me, it just looks like they're cutting branches and shoots off trees and shrubs. To say we're missing the point is an understatement.

I interviewed Tim about the art of pruning. Here are the takeaways from that interview with applications to leadership teams.

  • Context Matters: Any world-class garden is designed to create an effect on visitors. For a Japanese garden, that effect is to have humans feel connected to nature through composed scenes.
  • Leadership Application: What effect are you trying to create in customers and employees? What do you want to be famous for? Get clear on that before you start pruning. It provides you with the right mindset - the artistic eye - for the job.
  • What it's all about (A): At a basic level, pruning keeps the garden alive by avoiding over-crowding. Tim says, "We'd lose this garden within a year if we didn't prune it." Individual plants need pruning so that they get enough light to stay healthy.
  • Leadership Application: How do you know if your key projects are healthy? When is the last time you examined them for signs of drift or bloat? The law of entropy applies at work just like in a garden.
  • What it's all about (B): At a deeper level, pruning helps each plant fit with the rest of the plants around it in the "composition." No individual plant can be managed on its own but only as it relates to the scene it creates with those around it.
  • Leadership Application: When your senior team prunes work efforts, how much of the conversation centers on how each project fits into the larger picture? Effective leadership teams design the overall work portfolio to achieve a specific strategic goal. So if a company needs to ramp up innovation to respond to a changing environment, they look at the overall weighting of their efforts and ensure that enough of them are focused on exploratory work.
  • What it's all about (C): At its deepest level, pruning preserves the potential of the garden for future generations. By maintaining individual plants and the overall composition, you have the potential to create extraordinary experiences for people in the future.
  • Leadership Application: What pruning needs to happen now to preserve the potential of your organization for the future?
  • How to learn it: Pruning looks simple but takes years to master. Mastery starts with humility and then continues with observation of skilled pruners, experimentation under supervision, and being comfortable with the risk of mistakes.
  • Leadership Application: How intentionally do you practice the skill of pruning as a senior team? I'm not talking about the reactive cost cuts that come when business turns south or someone tells you that you must cut now. We all know what that sort of reactive exercise feels like. I'm talking about making it an art you master through regular, intentional practice.

Do some pruning before your next planning session so that your brilliant new ideas can be put into action. That way you won't feel overwhelmed or discouraged. You'll feel hopeful.

And if all this talk of pruning leaves you needing a Zen moment, grab a cup of green tea and check out this aerial video of Anderson Japanese Gardens shot from a drone by noted photographer Nels Akerlund.

Click below for Tim's 60-second summary of the essence of pruning - or here for the entire 13-minute interview where Tim dives into the thinking behind pruning at a world-class garden. You'll never look at workers pruning a garden the same way again.

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