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What 4/20 Could Look Like In Five Years

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The landscape of the cannabis community is changing fast. So fast that the "high holiday" could grow beyond anyone's current imaginings. 4/20 just five years into the future could look entirely different than it does today.

Fast forward to April 20th, 2018. A new person will occupy the White House. Among the top contenders for the job right now are Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton, Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul. Of those, only Senator Paul has been open about favoring drug policy reform.

In the federal legislative branch we find a slight bit of momentum backed by optimism for real change in the next five years. This will likely take an infusion of dozens of new, younger representatives in the next two election cycles.

Most change over the next five years will come from the states, as is always the case, especially in the world of marijuana law reform.

"I think that, in five years and beyond, 4/20 will become a day of remembrance," Amanda Reiman, California Policy Manager for the Drug Policy Alliance, told The 420 Times. "Yes, it will always involve celebration of all things marijuana/hemp, but, as more states legalize, I see it as an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, how far we have yet to go, and the people still behind bars for marijuana use. I could imagine moments of silence and vigils during celebrations in legal states like WA, CO, ME, CA, and OR to send wishes and prayers to those still living under prohibition."

States that should have legal recreational marijuana by 2018 certainly include California, Maine and Oregon. Other possibilities include states with long-standing medical marijuana programs, like Hawaii and New Mexico. Imagine massive 4/20 celebrations in places like Los Angeles, SanFrancisco/Oakland and the Portlands in Oregon and Maine, with those possessing cannabis being legal, at least in the eyes of state and local authorities.

But none of this happens without you. Even something as simple as sharing stories like this on your social networks contributes to the greater goal: marijuana legalization nationwide. Everyone doing their part all adds up to success, as was proven last fall in Washington and Colorado.

The time is now.