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Bhaskar Chakravorti

Disrupting Cash in India: Modi's Unprecedented Social Experiment

Bhaskar Chakravorti | December 6, 2016 | World
This article first appeared in my regular column in the Indian Express. "Time has come for everyone, particularly my young friends, to embrace e-banking, mobile banking and more such technology". So said Narendra Modi, doubling up as the nation's digital evangelist-in-chief. Appropriately, he "said" this via a tweet. PM Modi's...
The Conversation Global

No food, no water, no sleep: is Brazil torturing student protesters?

The Conversation Global | December 6, 2016 | College
Students in Paraná state began occupying school buildings to protest education reforms in October 2016. Ingrid Matuoka/Wikimedia Renato Francisco dos Santos Paula, Universidade Federal de Goias Brazil's public relations disaster has gone from bad to worse. In September, congress impeached president Dilma Rousseff for...
The Conversation US

How a New Colombian Peace Agreement Came So Quickly After a 'No' Vote?

The Conversation US | December 6, 2016 | Impact
By Arthur Lupia, University of Michigan In October, when Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos won the Nobel Peace Prize, some people were confused. Why did Santos receive the prize days after Colombian voters narrowly defeated a historic peace agreement? A closer look at Santos' strategic actions offers...
Daniel Wagner

Can the Iranian Nuclear Deal Survive the Trump Presidency?

Daniel Wagner | December 6, 2016 | World
Donald Trump's shocking victory will bear important, albeit unclear, implications for a variety of America's bilateral relationships, few more important than its relationship with Iran and the impact that may have on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Throughout his campaign, Trump made no secret of his opposition to...
ResearchGate

ADHD makes for better entrepreneurs

ResearchGate | December 6, 2016 | Business
Entrepreneurship researcher Johan Wiklund of Syracuse University was alerted to the link between ADHD and entrepreneurship after family experiences led him to learn more about mental health issues. This encouraged him to look at how ADHD can be a positive influence. We spoke to Wiklund about...
Pioneers for Change

Agent for Change: Agent Yogibanker

Pioneers for Change | December 6, 2016 | Impact
By: Scott Robinson The winds of change sweep through the world from time to time: we saw it with Barack Obama being elected as the first African-American president. We saw it with the unexpected Brexit vote, and whilst I don't pretend my YOGIBANKER...
Doug Bandow

U.S. Policy Should Appeal To Chinese Public Opinion

Doug Bandow | December 6, 2016 | World
When the Berlin Wall fell 27 years ago, signaling the end of communism as a serious international force, no one cared much what people in China thought. The People's Republic of China had escaped its Maoist catastrophe only a decade before. Beijing was almost a nullity in foreign affairs. Today...
Steve Zwick

Deforestation and the Trillion-Dollar Time Bomb

Steve Zwick | December 6, 2016 | Business
You probably recognize many of the companies on the first of the two lists we'll be examining today - like Colgate Palmolive, L'Oréal, and McDonald's, which are household names. You might not know the others - like Marfrig Global Foods and Bunge - but they're...
E. Nina Rothe

Style with a Conscience: "Orange Your Heart!" with SeeMe and Caterina Occhio

E. Nina Rothe | December 6, 2016 | Style
We may have marched on November 25th in support of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and we can find agreement to #bringbackourgirls when we tweet about the Nigerian students kidnapped by Boko Haram. And yes, we cry in...
Richard Koch

REWRITING THE NARRATIVE OF YOUR LIFE

Richard Koch | December 6, 2016 | Business
"We tell ourselves stories in order to live ... We live entirely by the imposition of a narrative upon disparate images, by the "ideas" which we have learned to freeze the shifting phantasmagoria which is our actual experience." I was struck this week by this quote from Joan Didion's book...
The Conversation Africa

Boredom, alienation and anxiety in the maths classroom? Here's why

The Conversation Africa | December 6, 2016 | World
Brian Hudson, University of Sussex The quest for appropriate teaching and learning practices for children and young people is ongoing and ever present. A major challenge is to make maths teaching more inclusive and maths itself more accessible to...
Louisiana Channel

Alan Hollinghurst: The Secret Life of a Poem

Louisiana Channel | December 6, 2016 | Books
An inspiring conversation with the award-winning English novelist Alan Hollinghurst - noted for his novel 'The Line of Beauty' - about being a sort of puppet master to his characters and being characterized as "a gay writer." "I read poetry obsessively all through my adolescence." Hollinghurst went to boarding school in an old gothic house in the countryside where the lady of the house was a friend of the Victorian poet Alfred Tennyson. Tennyson thus came to influence Hollinghurst's writing a great deal, poetry being the first thing he wrote. In time, however, he turned to novel writing: "The lovely thing about being a novelist is that you're in charge and you can sort of just put in whatever you like, and I think I have a tendency to indulge my own enthusiasm." Hollinghurst enjoys playing with narrative and with what one expects - and having the authority to decide his characters' fate: "I quite enjoy exercising my power to be sort of cruel and restrictive to my characters ... and to bring them to horrible ends." On writing about homosexuality, the English novelist comments that he initially was able to investigate a relatively unexplored area of fiction: "I know when I started I felt that there was this opportunity to write about a whole area of subject matter, which hadn't really been looked at in literary fiction." Moreover, he felt that there was also a political point in doing so, especially as he started out in the mid-1980s, when the AIDS epidemic broke out, and the social and political change during Margaret Thatcher's government seemed to allow a more hostile attitude towards homosexuals: "There was all the more point in being upfront and out there about all these things." Alan Hollinghurst (b. 1954) is a British novelist, poet and short story writer, whose works often evolve around (homo)sexual themes. Hollinghurst is the author of the novels 'The Swimming Pool Library' (1988), 'The Folding Star' (1994), 'The Spell' (1998), 'The Line of Beauty' (2004) and 'The Stranger's Child' (2011). He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 1989 Somerset Maugham Award, the 1994 James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the 2004 Man Booker Prize (for 'The Line of Beauty'). He lives in London, England. Alan Hollinghurst was interviewed by Martin Krasnik at the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2012. During the interview Hollinghurst discusses his novel 'The Stranger's Child' (2011). Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art,...
Louisiana Channel

Gardar Eide Einarsson: The Violence Under the Surface

Louisiana Channel | December 6, 2016 | Arts
"I've lost the youthful naivetyé that leads me to think authorities should be torn down. I see it as an on-going negotiation." Norweaygian- born Gardar Eide Einarsson who is now based in Tokyo, knows first-hand how different societies deal with authority. Einarsson grew up in grew up in Norway in the 1970s and 80s, a time more focused on the utopias of community, and in which conflict was discussed less than it is today. He later moved to New York City, drawn to rebellious cultures as he always was. His work explores authority and the way it asserts itself through images: ""I'm attracted to images that have a falseness to them that reveals that the images are not 100 per cent believable," he says. In this video Einarsson presents an installation from 2016 consisting of found objects: blue lights from Tokyo's Yamanote train line in Japan. The lights were installed at the train line to reduce the number of suicides as they are supposed to have a positive, comforting effect. Read more about this specific work here: nextcity.org/daily/entry/how-blue-lights-on-train-platforms-combat-tokyos-suicide-epidemic The title of the Einarsson's installation - 'Distinct Functional Layers Help Establish Hierarchy and Order' - is taken from Apple's presentation of a new operating system (iOS7). Gardar Eide Einarsson (b. 1976) is a Norwegian artist working in installation, printmaking, painting and sculpture. His work explores forms of social transgression and images for political subversion. His work has been shown worldwide and is held in the collections of the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, Norway, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden, LACMA, Los Angeles and MoMA, New York, USA. Gardar Eide Einarsson was interviewed by Christian Lund at Nils Stærk Gallery in Copenhagen in February 2016. Camera: Simon Weyhe Edited by: Klaus Elmer Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 Supported by...
Scott Fischler

A Few Words About Flu

Scott Fischler | December 6, 2016 | Healthy Living
This is National Influenza Vaccination Week, so I'm planning to get my flu shot on Wednesday morning.
Spottoon

STEEL RAIN - Ep.14

Spottoon | December 6, 2016 | Entertainment
The news of Kim Jong-Il's death from Pyongyang leads to a coup in North Korea. While the hawks in the North Korean military push the Korean peninsula to the brink of an all-out nuclear war, Park, an assistant secretary at Blue House and the President's nephew in Seoul, finds himself at the very crux of international power game surrounding the peninsula. With his pregnant wife held as hostage in North Korea, Park has to play his own game of confidence and tricks - It's a showdown with a nuclear war at stake.
Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych.

Separation Anxiety: Why It Happens And How To Support Your Child

Dr. Vanessa Lapointe, R. Psych. | December 5, 2016 | Parents
We are wired for connection, and particularly in times of stress, danger, or upset we long for it and seek it with intensity. This longing for connection is primal - a basic instinctual need that our psyche drives at relentlessly.
Rose Ann DeMoro

Repealing Obamacare? Here's A Better Idea: Medicare For All

Rose Ann DeMoro | December 6, 2016 | Politics
Let's build the demand to protect, improve and expand Medicare.
Vincenzo Prosperi

Easiest and Sexiest Italian Christmas Cake Recipe, Christmas Party 2016

Vincenzo Prosperi | December 5, 2016 | Taste
Italian Christmas Cake Recipe Italian Christmas Cake Recipe that you have dreaming for. Ever tried to make a Christmas tree for dessert during the festive season? This is the no fuss, no bake Italian Christmas Cake recipe filled with creamy Italian custard and topped with fresh fruit that will...
Adam Hanft

140-Character Catharsis: The Secret Appeal Of Trump's Rust Belt Strategy

Adam Hanft | December 5, 2016 | Politics
Trump's in-the-moment, consequence-free, grandly unedited Twitter style is a potent fantasy for working-class people who have to step cautiously through the daily discouragements of their lives. (Middle-managers live in a similar chamber of limits.)
Roanna Mottershead

Things you Need to Know Before Road-Tripping Round Iceland

Roanna Mottershead | December 5, 2016 | Travel
Picture one of those TV documentaries where the camera pans across deserted icy tundra... and you have Iceland! The unparalleled natural scenery makes it the perfect place to take a road trip like no other. Driving in a strange country in wintery conditions can be daunting. You could take...