THE BLOG
01/15/2014 01:47 pm ET | Updated Mar 17, 2014

Fact-Checking 7 Popular Food and Drink Urban Legends

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The urban legends you heard back in the day are still making the playground rounds, though these days kids spread the rumors by hammering out a series of emojis. Since we've already debunked Willy Wonka once and for all, we decided to turn our attention to some of the more persistent food and drink-themed legends that just won't die. Don't lose any more sleep over the fate of Little Mikey the Pop Rocks kid -- we've got all the truths and lies right here.

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Credit: Valerie's Voice

The legend
Life cereal poster boy Little Mikey died from mixing Pop Rocks and Coke.

True or False?
False

The facts
This one is easy to shoot down since the guy who played that ridiculously picky Little Mikey, John Gilchrist, is still alive and well. The rumor was so bad when it first circulated in the '70s that the FDA had to set up a hotline for freaked out parents assuring them that the candy was safe, and Little Mikey's mom had to tell her sobbing neighbors that her son was totally fine. Today, Gilchrist is director of media sales for Madison Square Garden, the place basketball goes to die.

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Credit: Wikicommons/Michael Murphy

The legend
People's stomachs have exploded from drinking Coke with Mentos.

True or False?
False

The facts
Just like the Little Mikey myth, this thing's total BS. As Snopes points out, the chain emails that claim kids in Brazil died from this lethal experiment offer no specifics beyond "Brazil", "little boy", and "last week", and there probably would have been more intel from a police report or the local press if a kid actually busted his intestines with Mentos. What's more, the Mythbusters guys debunked this. And you do not question the science whiz with the walrus 'stache.

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Credit: Blogspot/Sierra Godfrey

The legend
Tootsie Pop wrappers featuring a Native American chief with a star get you free candy.

True or False?
False

The facts
For decades, kids listening to their conspiracy theorist friend Trevor have been laboring under the delusion that finding a Tootsie Pop wrapper with a Native American chief shooting at a star scores them free candy. Unfortunately, Trevor's always been full of it (Tim Allen is not your dad, Trevor!). No one's sure when the rumor started, but the company has never offered any kind of finder's prize. Kids sending in letters demanding comped treats might get "the legend of Chief Shooting Star" back in the mail, which is basically like getting a toothbrush on Halloween.

We'll give you the inside scoop on graham crackers, Dr. Pepper, gum (and whether or not it stays in your stomach for 7 years), and if Coke was made with cocaine, all in the full story on Thrillist.com!

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