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The Climate Post: Obama Releases Report, Other Initiatives Directed at Tackling Climate Change Impacts

04/10/2015 11:17 am ET | Updated Jun 10, 2015

President Barack Obama announced a series of steps that aim to tackle the effects of climate change on the health of Americans. These 150 health-focused actions to boost climate change preparedness expand on the Climate Data Initiative launched this year.

"The sooner we act, the more we can do to protect the health of our communities our kids, and those that are the most vulnerable," the White House said in a statement. "As part of the Administration's overall effort to combat climate change and protect the American people, this week, the Administration is announcing a series of actions that will allow us to better understand, communicate, and reduce the health impacts of climate change on our communities."

Beyond the list of initiatives -- including expanding access to climate and health data, improving air quality data and convening a climate change and health summit -- the administration released a draft report on the observed and future impacts of climate change on our health. It focuses on risks such as weather extremes, air quality and water-and food-related issues that could affect Americans and is open for public comment. A final draft is expected for release in early 2016.

Another report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Adaptation in Action", highlights successful actions by state leaders in Arizona, California, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota and New York to reduce the health impacts of climate change.

Study Forecasts Canadian Glacier Loss; Could Have Wider Implications

A new study published in the journal Nature Geoscience predicts how much glaciers in western Canada will shrink -- as much as 70 percent by 2100 -- depending on the rate of carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere between now and the end of the century.

"Over the next century, there is going to be a huge loss," said lead author Garry Clarke of the University of British Columbia. "The glaciers are telling us that we're changing the climate."

The study -- the first to model many glaciers in detail at one time -- could have implications for predicting glacier loss around the world. New Scientist reports that unlike previous studies -- including one by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change -- this Nature Geoscience study relies on detailed analysis of how glaciers are likely to move and change shape as they melt. The earlier studies relied on the difference between the amount of snow falling on the glacier at higher altitudes and the amount of thawing at lower ones.

Climate Change Triggers Rising Tide of Troubles for California

Last week the Risky Business Project released its third report on the economic impacts of climate change, a report calling on business leaders to push for policy reform and to factor climate change into their businesses' risk models.

From Boom to Bust? Climate Risk in the Golden State describes how extreme heat and shifting precipitation patterns from escalating climate change will drain California's water supply, worsen drought and wildfire, and undermine agriculture. Rising temperatures will also lead to decreased labor productivity, increased energy costs, and greater air pollution. Human health and property will be put at risk: a doubling or tripling of the number of days with temperatures exceeding 95 degrees Fahrenheit could contribute to nearly 7,700 additional heat-related deaths per year by century's end, and rising sea levels along the California coast could submerge $10 billion in property by 2050.

The report was published the same day that California Gov. Jerry Brown placed first-ever mandatory water restrictions on all Californians, a response to the state's fourth year of drought, which has already challenged many of the state's businesses. The executive order calls for a 25 percent slash in water use and comes as the Sierra Nevada snowpack, which Californians rely on heavily for summertime water needs, neared a record low.

The Climate Post offers a rundown of the week in climate and energy news. It is produced each Thursday by Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.