Huffpost Green

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

Tim Profeta Headshot

The Climate Post: White House Announces New Climate Change Initiatives

Posted: Updated:

The White House on Wednesday announced executive actions to help states and communities build their resilience to more intense storms, high heat, sea level rise, and other effects of climate change. The actions, which involve several federal agencies, were among the recommendations by the president's State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience.

"...Climate change poses a direct threat to the infrastructure of America that we need to stay competitive in this 21st century economy," said President Obama. "We're going to do more, including new 3D maps to help state, local officials in communities understand which areas and which infrastructure are at risk as a consequence of climate change. We're going to help communities improve their electric grids, build stronger seawalls and natural barriers, and protect their water supplies. We're also going to invest in stronger more resilient infrastructure."

The National Journal runs down the individual efforts by agency, which include a more than $236 million award to fund eight states' efforts to improve rural electric infrastructure and a new guide by the Centers for Disease Control that will help local public health departments assess their area's vulnerabilities to health hazards associated with climate change.

States Focus of Work after EPA's Proposed Power Plant Rule

More than a month after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a proposed rule to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants, a new study says states are well positioned to handle the rule's requirements.

The rule, which uses an infrequently exercised provision of the Clean Air Act to set state-specific reduction targets and devise individual or joint state plans to meet those targets, has garnered some negative reactions. But the study conducted by the Analysis Group sees real benefits. The research examined states that have already taken steps toward reducing power plant emissions and found that if states design programs effectively, electricity rate increases will be modest in the near term, and electric bills will fall in the long term.

"Several states have already put a price on carbon dioxide pollution, and their economies are doing fine," said Susan Tierney, senior adviser of the Analysis Group. "The bottom line: the economy can handle--and actually benefit from--these rules."

States that work together to form carbon markets and other collaborative initiatives could experience even greater rewards, according to the Analysis Group.

"Experience shows that states that work together on market-based compliance initiatives--like RGGI [Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative] in the Northeast--can provide net economic benefits in terms of jobs and economic output," said study co-author Paul Hibbard. "And RGGI shows that each state can have control over its own program design, so that combined efforts don't step on states' rights."

Earlier this week environmental attorneys and representatives from states, industry, and NGOs gathered to discuss the EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan--specifically state choices under and the potential impacts of the proposal--at an event hosted by the Environmental Law Institute and Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. Keynote speaker and U.S. EPA Senior Counsel Joseph Goffman highlighted three aspects of the rule: the EPA developed state emission goals based emission reduction strategies already being used by states, the proposal allows each state maximum flexibility to optimize strategies given local considerations, and state flexibility with the timing of implementation allows the coordination of compliance strategies with other dynamics in the energy sector.

Mountaintop Removal Focus of Court Case, Study

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has ruled in favor of the EPA's permitting process for mountaintop mining, a controversial practice to extract coal by way of clear cutting trees and removing mountain tops with explosives. The ruling overturned a decision by a lower court that found the EPA did not have authority to require mountaintop removal coal permits to go through an enhanced review process to crack down on water contamination from mining operations.

In 2009 the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers adopted the Enhanced Coordination Process, allowing the EPA to screen and review individual mining permits submitted to the Army Corps of Engineers under the Clean Water Act. By 2011, the EPA recommended states impose more stringent conditions for issuing permits under the act--issuing a final guidance document relating to these permits.

"In our view, EPA and the Corps acted within their statutory authority when they adopted the Enhanced Coordination Process," wrote Judge Brett Kavanaugh (subscription). "And under our precedents, the Final Guidance is not final agency action reviewable by the courts at this time."

A new study by the U.S. Geological Survey finds that mountaintop removal mining negatively affects downstream fish populations.

Researchers compared samples collected from nearby bodies of water in 2010 and 2011 to samples collected by Penn State University researchers in 1999 and 2001. They found that mountaintop mining creates landscape changes, including changes in water flow that have significant impacts on fish.

"We're seeing significant reductions in the number of fish species and total abundance of fish downstream from mining operations," said Nathaniel Hitt, a study co-author.

Solar on the Rise in the U.S.

Solar power is becoming a vital part of the American economy, according to a report from the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC).

"Solar markets are booming in the United States due to falling photovoltaic (PV) prices, strong consumer demand, available financing, renewable portfolio standards (RPSs), and financial incentives from the federal government, states and utilities," said Larry Sherwood, vice president and COO of the IREC. "Thirty-four percent more PV capacity was installed in 2013 than the year before accounting for 31 percent of all U.S. electric power installations completed in 2013."

The report, produced annually, highlights major factors affecting the solar market and ranks the top 10 states in several categories.

The Climate Post offers a rundown of the week in climate and energy news. It is produced each Thursday by Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.

From Our Partners