Regime Change in America

06/09/2015 11:33 am ET | Updated Jun 09, 2016

They say that imperial wars come home in all sorts of ways. Think of the Michigan that TomDispatch regular Laura Gottesdiener describes today in "A Magical Mystery Tour of American Austerity Politics" as one curious example of that dictum. If you remember, in the spring of 2003, George W. Bush ordered the invasion of Iraq and the overthrow of that country's autocratic ruler, Saddam Hussein. The invasion was launched with a "shock-and-awe" air show that was meant to both literally and figuratively "decapitate" the country's leadership, from Saddam on down. At that time, there was another more anodyne term for the process that was also much in use, even if it has now faded from our vocabularies: "regime change." And you remember how that all worked out, don't you? A lot of Iraqi civilians -- but no Iraqi leaders -- were killed in shock-and-awe fashion that first night of the invasion and, as most Americans recall now that we're in Iraq War 3.0, it didn't get much better when the Bush administration's proconsul in Baghdad, L. Paul Bremer III, disbanded the Iraqi military and Saddam's Baathist Party (a brilliant formula for launching an instant insurgency), appointed his own chosen rulers in Baghdad, and gave the Americans every sort of special privilege imaginable by curiously autocratic decree in the name of spreading democracy in the Middle East.

It now seems that a version of regime change, Iraqi-style, has come home to roost in parts of Michigan -- but with a curious twist. Think of Michigan's governor, Rick Snyder, as the L. Paul Bremer of that state. He's essentially given himself regime-change-style powers, impermeable to a statewide recall vote, and begun dismissing -- or, if you will, decapitating -- the local governments of cities and school districts, appointing managers in their place. In other words, his homegrown version of regime change involves getting rid of local democracy and putting individual autocrats in power instead. What, you might ask yourself, could possibly go wrong, especially since the governor himself is going national to limn the glories of his version of austerity and autocratic politics?

As it happens, TomDispatch dispatched our ace reporter, Laura Gottesdiener, who has been traveling the underside of American life for this site, to check out what regime change in Michigan really looks like. As with all her reports, this time with photographer Eduardo García, she offers a grim but startling vision of where this country may be headed.