THE BLOG

Updating Our Merchants of Doubt

03/12/2015 11:38 am ET | Updated May 12, 2015

Welcome to the asylum! I'm talking, of course, about this country, or rather the world Big Oil spent big bucks creating. You know, the one in which the obvious -- climate change -- is doubted and denied, and in which the new Republican Congress is actively opposed to doing anything about it. Just the other day, for instance, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wrote a column in his home state paper, the Lexington Herald-Leader, adopting the old Nancy Reagan slogan "just say no" to climate change. The senator from Coalville, smarting over the Obama administration's attempts to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, is urging state governors to simply ignore the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed "landmark limits" on those plants -- to hell with the law and to hell, above all, with climate change. But it's probably no news to you that the inmates are now running the asylum.

Just weeks ago, an example of Big Energy's largess when it comes to sowing doubt about climate change surfaced. A rare scientific researcher, Wei-Hock Soon, who has published work denying the reality of climate change -- the warming of the planet, he claims, is a result of "variations in the sun's energy" -- turned out to have received $1.2 million from various fossil fuel outfits, according to recently released documents; nor did he bother to disclose such support to any of the publications using his work. "The documents," reported the New York Times, "show that Dr. Soon, in correspondence with his corporate funders, described many of his scientific papers as 'deliverables' that he completed in exchange for their money. He used the same term to describe testimony he prepared for Congress."

There's nothing new in this. Big Energy (like Big Tobacco before it) has for years been using a tiny cadre of scientists to sow uncertainty about the reality of climate change. Naomi Oreskes and Erik Conway wrote a now-classic investigative book, Merchants of Doubt, about just how the fossil fuel companies pulled this off, creating a public sense of doubt where a scientific one didn't exist. Now, the book has been made into a striking documentary film, which has just opened nationally. Someday, perhaps, all of this will enter a court of law where those who knowingly perpetrated fraud on the American and global publics and in the process threatened humanity with a disaster of potentially apocalyptic proportions will get their just desserts. On that distant day when those who ran the planet into the ground for corporate profits have to pay for their criminal acts, Merchants of Doubt will undoubtedly be exhibit one for the prosecution.

In the meantime, TomDispatch regular Michael Klare continues his invaluable chronicling at this site of the depredations of the big energy companies on this fragile planet of ours with his latest piece, "Big Oil's Broken Business Model."