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To the Critics of Daniel Murphy's Paternity Leave

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DANIEL MURPHY
Eliot J. Schechter via Getty Images

Dear Boomer Esiason and Mike Francesa,

I heard that Daniel Murphy, second baseman for the New York Mets, missed the first two games of the 2014 season. He missed those games because his wife had a baby. She delivered their son by C-section and he used the three days of paternity time allotted by Major League Baseball.

Both of you were very critical on your radio shows. Boomer said that Daniel's wife should have scheduled a C-section before the season. Mike said one day is all anyone needs to take. He said it was a "gimmick". Mike said hire a nurse and come back...

And in my humble opinion, you are both acting like a**holes.

I cannot say it any other way. I wish I could be more eloquent, but I cannot. You are both truly acting like a**holes, like mega a**holes.

See, I do not play sports. I am a restaurant manager. And in 2009, my wife and I were going to have our first child. We were nervous and excited all at the same time.

It was a rough pregnancy for my wife. Towards the end of the pregnancy, I was helping her do a lot of things. I would help her get around and try to do what I could for her.

All while working a lot of hours.

My boss at the time knew I was going to be a father. He sat me down and asked me how much time I needed to take off. I told him a week. He looked at me funny.

"A week? Really. I was thinking a day or two."

I told him that it was going to be a week because my wife was having a hard time. I wanted more because I wanted to be there for my wife. We did not have a lot of money at the time, but that was not as important as being there for my family. A week was good. My former company offered it as well.

He looked at me again. He took off his glasses and said a comment I will never forget.

"I really think you should take off a couple days. You do know the baby is not coming out of your vagina, right?"

There are many moments in my life that have changed the person I am. I remember the day my doctor told me if I did not lose weight, I would die. I remember the day I proposed to my wife. I remember the day my mom told me my father had cancer. I also remembered this day because it was the day I stood up for my family.

"Actually, I have a penis and my wife has a vagina. I also know the law and if you really want to fight me on this, let me know."

He apologized, but I knew I was done there.

My wife went through labor and then hours later had an emergency C-section. It is funny how you both consider a C-section a quick "pop a baby out and have dinner after." It is major surgery. There is a lot of recovery.

I ended up taking three weeks off. I did not get paid for that time. I helped my wife get better and helped take care of my son. It was hard, but worthwhile. It was not a vacation like so many people this it is.

When I came back, they were hiring people for my position. I quit after that.

I had a baby in August and my new boss asked me how much time I needed off. I told him a couple of weeks and he said no problem. My wife had another c-section, and I helped her get better along with being there for my son and daughter.

And I would not ever take back the time I was there for my family.

Your criticism of Daniel Murphy is ridiculous. For missing two games in a season you will not remember? That is your argument? Because men play ball and women stay home? What year is this?

Shame on both of you. You are trying to get the manly men who listen to your radio programs to shame a man for doing the right thing. There are men in Iraq who cannot be there when their children are born. A baseball player is able to be there for his wife and you are being critical?

Daniel followed the rules. He was there for his wife and his child.

Why don't you talk about the athletes who are not there for their kids, not criticize the ones who are?

Regards,

Tony Posnanski