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Highest Paying Internships and How to Land One

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Looking to learn more in your trade while making money at the same time? Most internships give you plenty of experience but require a lot of work for little to no pay; however, if you're lucky enough to land one with a company like Facebook, Apple, or Google you're in for a delightful treat. Interns at companies such as these are making somewhere in the ballpark of $5,000 to $6,000 a month.

On top of these monthly wages many of these interns are also reaping the benefits of special perks including things like free ipads, iphones, laptops, and other new technological toys.

So what does it take to land a position like this? Just because Facebook is your life, you own all products Apple, or you Google every question you've ever had doesn't make you the perfect candidate. You have to be able to answer the question "Why Facebook?" "Why Apple?" or "Why Google?" in a manner that proves to your interviewer that you'll make a difference at their company. As Forbeswoman  Frances Bridges stated in her article "How To Get An Awesome Internship" said,

"'The most successful answers to the question, 'Why Facebook?' are things you'd really like to change about Facebook -- whether it's a feature you wish existed, or a bug you'd like to fix, or just a design you think we got wrong,'" says Jocelyn Goldfein, a director of Engineering at Facebook. "If you get an internship at Facebook, you get the same access to the source code that all of our full-time engineers do. We want to hire people who'll use that access to make a big, positive impact.'"

So perhaps instead of searching for that soul-sucking, hamburger flipping summer job, making minimum wage at best; you should work on creating the perfect resume and decide how you would answer the question, "Why Facebook?" so that you can land that internship with a big time company next summer.

By Nicole Hillstead, Brigham Young University