GREEN
05/02/2009 05:12 am ET Updated May 25, 2011

Including Forest Protection in Carbon Markets Will Harm Emission Reduction Efforts, Greenpeace Report Warns

Deforestation, one of the main drivers of global warming, has barged its way to the heart of UN climate talks, which resumed in Bonn this week. Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation -- an effort known as REDD -- emerged last year as a key element in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. "There is broad consensus now that the post-2012 agreement will include some sort of incentives for tropical countries to reduce their deforestation," said Steve Schwartzman of Environmental Defense, an advocacy group based in Washington. The United States and a coalition of around 20 small rain-forest nations, led by Papua New Guinea and Costa Rica, are demanding that deforestation "credits" be added to carbon markets, say sources. Under carbon trading -- an innovation of the Kyoto Protocol that will be superseded by the treaty -- companies in industrialised nations can offset obligations to slash CO2 emissions by funding certified carbon-reduction projects in the developing world. 2

Require national-level reductions in forest emissions in order to avoid the problem of leakage (i.e. deforestation shifting from one area to another), which would inevitably result from project-based (i.e. " subnational approaces. 1
  1. Including Forest Protection in Carbon Markets Will Harm Emission Reduction Efforts, Greenpeace Report Warns (treehugger)
  2. UN Climate Talks: Save the Forests -- but How? (Yahoo Environment)

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