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Yehuda Benguigui
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Yehuda brings more than 35 years of experience planning, implementing and evaluating child health programs to the MCHIP team. A globally and regionally recognized expert in child health, acute respiratory infection, and diarrheal disease control, he served as WHO/PAHO's Senior Advisor for Child and Neonatal Health for more than 20 years before retiring in 2011. In his role at PAHO, he spearheaded the introduction of IMCI at both facility and community levels across the LAC region and worked on the development of comprehensive child health strategies and action plans at country and regional level. He was also instrumental in forming and leading global and regional partnerships, managing the Technical Secretariat of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Technical Advisory Group for more than 10 years and being actively involved in bringing together a wide range of stakeholders to form the current LAC Interagency Regional Neonatal Alliance, of which MCHIP is an active partner.

Yehuda also brings solid field experience to his new position and MCHIP. Early in his career, he served as a medical officer, as a professor of preventative and community medicine, and as Under Secretary of Health in his home state of Pará, Brazil. He is deeply committed to contributing to the global understanding of important child health issues and has provided editorial support to multiple academic journals, authored or co-authored 35 books and published more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals. He has also received 15 professional awards from 11 countries over the course of his career.

Entries by Yehuda Benguigui

The Funding is Commendable: But What About Coordination? Working Together to Save Children's Lives

(0) Comments | Posted September 25, 2013 | 3:36 PM

There are roughly 750 days left to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Among other benchmarks, this means reducing the number of child deaths worldwide by two-thirds (MDG4). The three primary killers of children under 5 years of age -- pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria -- are both preventable and treatable...

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