08/18/2009 05:12 am ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

How Gyro Meat Is Made (VIDEO)

If it's in fact true that we are what we eat, it's always important to know what we're actually eating and where it comes from. The New York Times' recent article on the history and production of the budget favorite gyro tells us all about the industrial process that goes into making those mystery cones.

The process starts with boxes of raw beef and lamb trimmings, and ends with what looks like oversized Popsicles the shade of a Band-Aid. In between, the meat is run through a four-ton grinder, where bread crumbs, water, oregano and other seasonings are added. A clumpy paste emerges and is squeezed into a machine that checks for metal and bone. ("You can never be too careful," Mr. Tomaras said.) Hydraulic pressure -- 60 pounds per square inch -- is used to fuse the meat into cylinders, which are stacked on trays and then rolled into a flash freezer, where the temperature is 20 degrees below zero.

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If you want more of a visual, check out this footage filmed at Kronos foods, the largest gyro manufacturer in the US.