TASTE
11/04/2011 11:30 am ET Updated Aug 31, 2012

How To Bread Poultry

For 60 years, The Culinary Institute of America has been setting the standard for excellence in professional culinary education. In this video series, experienced chefs and educators show you how to tackle essential cooking techniques.

Watch this video to learn how to bread chicken in a few simple steps.

Video Transcript


I'm Chef Rob Mullooly from the Culinary Institute of America, and I'm here to show you a kitchen basic: today we're going to bread poultry.

This is a technique that can be applied to poultry; it can be applied to veal; it can be applied to vegetables as well. This is why we call it standard breading procedure, because it is standard for many items.

What we have here is a fresh chicken cutlet. We'll pass it through flour, and then egg wash, and then some nice breadcrumbs.

First, you always need to season your protein; it's very important. Use some nice kosher salt and when you season, we season from above like this so the salt gets distributed evenly. Then you'll come in with some fresh black pepper - just a slight hint of black pepper in the background.

Your next step after you season is to go and dredge your cutlet in flour. Make sure you get it evenly coated, and the biggest thing here is to pat off that excess flour, because otherwise if you have too much flour you're not going to be getting the egg to stick to the item properly. So we've got it patted out nice, we're seasoned and floured, and next we go right in with the egg wash here. You want to be sure we're completely submerged in the egg. Then let that excess drain off, go over to the breadcrumbs, and you can turn this several times and you can also kind of pat it inside the breadcrumbs.

So if you're completely breaded at this point, you're in good shape, and then you can take off the excess breadcrumbs.

You can bread them in advance, and you can also bread them and freeze them. And then you can sauté them, if they're that thin, right out of the freezer - because they're going to cook relatively quickly.