CHICAGO
03/08/2013 07:48 pm ET Updated Mar 08, 2013

Dixmoor Mayoral Race Has Mom Running Against Son: 'I Wish I Could Evict His A**'

Plenty of families fight over politics, but one household in suburban Chicago at least agrees the next mayor of their town should be a Casey — they just can't agree on which one.

Wendy Casey, 45, is running for mayor of the village of Dixmoor. So is her son, Randall, 27.

"In all the years I've been around, I have never heard of that at all," Roosevelt University professor professor Paul Green told the Tribune.

Both Caseys share a home together in Dixmoor, though the Tribune reports being recast from their roles as loving mother and son to political foes has been a rough transition; talks are mostly limited to polite kitchen run-ins and rent collection time.

According to the Tribune, Wendy Casey said laughing, "I wish I could evict his ass."

Wendy, a political activist, has a differing vision for the struggling town than her son, a cable technician. According to United Press International, Randall wants the suburb to "undergo a forensic audit and to operate on a smaller budget while bringing in economic and social development."

Wendy, meanwhile, wants to prioritize putting tenants back into abandoned homes, improving the town's aging sewer system and boosting community involvement.

"I love my mother dearly, so it's hard for me to see her as an opponent," Randall said in a Tribune video (embedded). "I refuse to see her as an opponent. She's just my mother who happens to be in the race."

Wendy said if her son were to beat her in the race she "cry," but she would "respect him as Village President."

Both mother and son are squaring off against one another — plus two additional candidates — in the April election as contenders vie to run the cash-strapped, scandal-ridden town.

In February, Dixmoor's current mayor, Keevan Grimmett, was booted from the ballot over allegations his address made him ineligible before a judge apparently overturned the ruling on appeal.

Ironically, the accusation was made by a former trustee who resigned in 2012 after pleading guilty to stealing gas from the village.

Just days prior, payroll was delayed for village employees after Grimmett told ABC Chicago a trio of village trustees upset with his budget policies refused to attend meetings or vote on action items.

RELATED ON HUFFPOST:

PHOTO GALLERY
HuffPost
BEFORE YOU GO
Distinguishable Members Of Congress
PHOTO GALLERY
Distinguishable Members Of Congress

CONVERSATIONS