PARENTING
06/04/2014 01:52 pm ET

Prematurity Rates Are Too High -- And Children's Hospitals Are Cashing In

BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Emma Walton had an easy pregnancy. She didn’t feel as much movement as the books had led her to expect, and the fetus regularly passed ultrasounds and nonstress tests.

After many hours of labor at a local community hospital in northwest Pennsylvania, the baby appeared distressed and needed to be delivered by emergency cesarean section. “They pulled him out and there was no sound,” Emma says. “You usually expect to hear a screaming baby and there was just nothing. Dead silence.”

Read more on Business Insider

CONVERSATIONS