COLLEGE
08/06/2014 11:49 am ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

Weed Was Way Cheaper On Campus 40 Years Ago

FILE - In this May 23, 1966, file photo, people roll joints at a marijuana party near the University of California at Berkele
FILE - In this May 23, 1966, file photo, people roll joints at a marijuana party near the University of California at Berkeley campus in Berkeley, Calif. In 2012, Washington state and Colorado voted to legalize and regulate its recreational use. But before that, the plant, renowned since ancient times for its strong fibers, medical use and mind-altering properties, was a staple crop of the colonies, an "assassin of youth," a counterculture emblem and a widely accepted - if often abused - medicine. On the occasion of “Legalization Day,” Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, when Washington’s new law takes effect, AP takes a look back at the cultural and legal status of the “evil weed” in American history. (AP Photo/File)

In the 1970's, marijuana could be had for as little as $8 or $10 an ounce at some Ivy League campuses.

Yes, back in the days of the Vietnam War, weed was cheap and freely written about in the pages of the Yale Daily News. And thanks to IvyGate, we know weed prices generally got the highest at Cornell University and the University of Pennsylvania, but even then you'd still need change to break a $50.

IvyGate did some research and compared the price of pot from the 1970's to today, counting for inflation and ran it against the High Times magazine consumer price index for marijuana.

TL;DR: Weed costs three to five times as much today as it did 40 years ago. But if you account for how much more potent marijuana is now, it's on par with the current prices for schwag (the low THC stuff).

Read the whole informative report at IvyGate, or check out the charts below:

Once more, with Schwag:

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