POLITICS

‘Six Californias' Is Officially Dead

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tim Draper presents his drivers license for identification purposes to Heather Ditty, elect
Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tim Draper presents his drivers license for identification purposes to Heather Ditty, elections manager for the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters, as he turns in boxes of petitions for a ballot initiative that would ask voters to split California into six separate states, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in Sacramento, Calif. Draper delivered what he said were 44,000 signatures, of the 1.3 million the Six California's campaign plans to submit statewide this week. If enough signatures are verified, voters in November 2016 would be asked to divide the state into six states called Jefferson, North California, Silicon Valley, Central California, West California and South California. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

A starry-eyed ballot initiative to split California into six separate states will not appear on the November 2016 ballot because it failed to gather enough qualifying signatures, the state announced Friday.

Just 66 percent of the signatures on Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tim Draper’s petition were valid, California Secretary of State Debra Bowen’s office tweeted with the release of the measure’s rejection. Petitions require 807,615 valid signatures, but the proposal, dubbed "Six Californias," fell short, with just 752,685 valid signatures.

It became clear days before the Friday deadline that making the ballot would be a long shot, as the petition would need an unlikely 207,752 valid signatures from Los Angeles County and three others that had not yet reported their petitions, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

The initiative reasoned that California was too big to function as one government and should be split up into six autonomous states: Silicon Valley, West California, North California, Central California, Jefferson and South California. Even if the proposal had made it on the ballot and been approved by Californians, the likelihood of Six Californias becoming a reality would remain incredibly far-fetched, as Congress would need to approve the legislation.

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