MEDIA
01/04/2015 11:00 am ET Updated Jan 04, 2015

John Cantlie Narrates Latest ISIS Propaganda Video From Mosul

The Islamic State has released its eighth propaganda video featuring British journalist John Cantlie, who has been held hostage by the extremist group since 2012.

In this installment, released on Friday, the 43-year-old Cantlie "reports" from Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, which has been under ISIS control since June. Contrary to what the western media has reported, Cantlie says in the video, Mosul is a stable place with plenty of electricity, very little crime, and a robust health care system.

Cantlie tours a seemingly bustling market to illustrate the normalcy of life in the city. He then visits children at a hospital who have purportedly been traumatized by falling bombs, and discusses the police force's efficiency compared to when the Iraqi government held control. He reads from what appear be printed-out articles, contradicting specific claims in western accounts about ISIS's ineffectiveness at governing. "Life here in Mosul is business as usual," he says near the beginning of the video. "This is not a city living in fear, as the western media would have you believe," he continues as he strolls through the market, demonstrating the working electricity.

At one point, he stands outside, shouting at an airplane flying overheard: "Down here! over here! Drop a bomb! Try to rescue me again! Do something! Useless! Absolutely useless!"

Recent reports have painted a dire picture of life in Mosul, from water contamination to the spread of hepatitis.

In previous videos, Cantlie had sometimes appeared gaunt, and often wore an orange jumpsuit -- an apparent reference to Guantanamo Bay prisoners -- as he criticized Western governments and warned of his own execution. But in this clip, Cantlie is wearing civilian clothes and looks healthy. With slick graphics and cuts, the video is produced in the sophisticated style that has become a calling card of ISIS.

Cantlie was kidnapped more than two years ago in Syria along with American journalist James Foley, who was beheaded in August.

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