BUSINESS
01/21/2015 05:32 am ET Updated Jan 21, 2015

Change.org Founder Ben Rattray Explains 'False Divide' Between Activists And 'Clicktivists'

Ben Rattray, the founder of Change.org, spoke with HuffPost Live at Davos about the "false divide" between what he called "clicktivists" -- people who engage in activist causes "on their couch" -- and people who are out in the streets fighting for change.

"I think the measure of the effectiveness of online action isn't whether it's easy to do, it's whether it actually accomplishes a specific goal," Rattray said.

"I think there's a false idea between the idea that people are just clictivists, that are slactivists sitting on their couch, and people in the streets," Rattray added. There's an intimate intertwining between the two, that support each other."

Rattray also weighed in on the White House's "We the People" page, which accepts petitions from Americans and response to those that reach a certain number of signatures.

"It's a huge step in the right direction," Rattray said, noting he wants "to see a world in which social movements and organizing is an every day experience."

Rattay said the spread of online petitions shows people are recognizing they can influence big institutions, making them "more likely to take action." But he did offer some criticism of sites like "We the People," which are run by the government.

"The challenge is that when tools are owned by and built by government, they tend not to be optimized for citizen empowerment," Rattray said.

Below, more updates from the 2015 Davos Annual Meeting:

01/24/2015 8:58 AM EST

McAfee On Evolution And Technology

"Evolution has wired us; we have social drives," McAfee said.

"Could there be a piece of technology that figures out an intelligent next question to ask somebody? Yeah," McAfee said.

01/24/2015 8:57 AM EST

'Making Workers Obsolete'

"For 200 years of industrial technology, we've been making workers obsolete," McAfee said.

McAfee said nobody knows if we're reaching the point where technological developments could lead to unemployment.

01/24/2015 8:56 AM EST

Andrew McAfee At Davos

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Andrew McAfee of the MIT Sloan School of Management on HuffPost Live

01/24/2015 8:46 AM EST

Bruder On The Barriers Women Face

"We strive to have the majority of our graduates female," EFE's Ron Bruder said.

"I don't think there's an official barrier but there's a social and structural barrier in a lot of these countries toward women," Bruder added.

Bruder said his company creates local foundations, and those foundations tackle those issues on EFE's behalf.

01/24/2015 8:42 AM EST

EFE's McAuliffe And Bruder: Young People Need Jobs

EFE's president and CEO Jamie McAuliffe, along with founder and chair Ron Bruder, sat down with HuffPost Live at Davos on Saturday.

Bruder said it's vital to the global economy that youths have jobs.

McAuliffe said EFE starts with businesses.

"Where are the jobs?" he said.

01/24/2015 8:14 AM EST

'Every Woman Has The Opportunity To Be An Activist'

Catchafire Founder & CEO Rachael Chong joins HuffPost Live to share her thoughts on how to get more women to Davos.

01/24/2015 8:11 AM EST

'Doing Less, But Better'

Greg McKeown, author of Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, said his book grew out of working with people who are really successful.

"Success can become a catalyst for failure," he said.

McKeown said leaders at Davos have experience with plateauing after achieving professional success. To avoid that, McKeown said, people must find a way to expand their contribution without doing more.

"The whole idea is about doing less, but better," he said.

01/24/2015 8:00 AM EST

Online Data Is Like Money

"In some sense, we're the next generation of banks," Smith said, noting you wouldn't put your data in a place you don't trust just like you wouldn't deposit your money at a bank you don't feel is stable.

01/24/2015 7:59 AM EST

Hacking Crime Difficulties

Smith said the most difficult part about investigating a hacking crime is identifying and finding a hacker.

"Our prisons are not full of hackers," Smith said, noting hackers are often in countries outside the U.S.

01/24/2015 7:57 AM EST

Brad Smith At Davos

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Brad Smith at Davos

CONVERSATIONS