BUSINESS
01/22/2015 05:41 am ET Updated Jan 22, 2015

Company Finds Success By Making Giving Back Part Of Its DNA

Suzanne DiBianca, president and co-founder of Salesforce Foundation, spoke with HuffPost Live at Davos on Thursday about the success her company has experienced by incorporating public service from the start.

"When we started the company in 2000, we said we wanted to be a new kind of business," DiBianca said.

"We said, we're going to not wait until we reach some level of more comfortable success, we're going to make giving back part of our DNA from the beginning," she added.

DiBianca said it's a "return to values" and not something new that's prompting more companies to give back. She also said she thinks "the proliferation of the internet economy" is encouraging more people to incorporate philanthropy into their business model.

DiBianca said employees at her company, who get six days each year for community service, have given "incredible" feedback about the company's dedication to giving back, with many telling the leaders of the company the opportunity to take part in community service is a good "retention tool".

"It's really important that we not only attract the best employees, but we keep them," she said.

Below, more updates from the 2015 Davos Annual Meeting:

01/24/2015 8:58 AM EST

McAfee On Evolution And Technology

"Evolution has wired us; we have social drives," McAfee said.

"Could there be a piece of technology that figures out an intelligent next question to ask somebody? Yeah," McAfee said.

01/24/2015 8:57 AM EST

'Making Workers Obsolete'

"For 200 years of industrial technology, we've been making workers obsolete," McAfee said.

McAfee said nobody knows if we're reaching the point where technological developments could lead to unemployment.

01/24/2015 8:56 AM EST

Andrew McAfee At Davos

a

Andrew McAfee of the MIT Sloan School of Management on HuffPost Live

01/24/2015 8:46 AM EST

Bruder On The Barriers Women Face

"We strive to have the majority of our graduates female," EFE's Ron Bruder said.

"I don't think there's an official barrier but there's a social and structural barrier in a lot of these countries toward women," Bruder added.

Bruder said his company creates local foundations, and those foundations tackle those issues on EFE's behalf.

01/24/2015 8:42 AM EST

EFE's McAuliffe And Bruder: Young People Need Jobs

EFE's president and CEO Jamie McAuliffe, along with founder and chair Ron Bruder, sat down with HuffPost Live at Davos on Saturday.

Bruder said it's vital to the global economy that youths have jobs.

McAuliffe said EFE starts with businesses.

"Where are the jobs?" he said.

01/24/2015 8:14 AM EST

'Every Woman Has The Opportunity To Be An Activist'

Catchafire Founder & CEO Rachael Chong joins HuffPost Live to share her thoughts on how to get more women to Davos.

01/24/2015 8:11 AM EST

'Doing Less, But Better'

Greg McKeown, author of Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, said his book grew out of working with people who are really successful.

"Success can become a catalyst for failure," he said.

McKeown said leaders at Davos have experience with plateauing after achieving professional success. To avoid that, McKeown said, people must find a way to expand their contribution without doing more.

"The whole idea is about doing less, but better," he said.

01/24/2015 8:00 AM EST

Online Data Is Like Money

"In some sense, we're the next generation of banks," Smith said, noting you wouldn't put your data in a place you don't trust just like you wouldn't deposit your money at a bank you don't feel is stable.

01/24/2015 7:59 AM EST

Hacking Crime Difficulties

Smith said the most difficult part about investigating a hacking crime is identifying and finding a hacker.

"Our prisons are not full of hackers," Smith said, noting hackers are often in countries outside the U.S.

01/24/2015 7:57 AM EST

Brad Smith At Davos

brad

Brad Smith at Davos

CONVERSATIONS