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#Tal3mrak: A Hashtag Challenges Saudi Arabian King

The phrase Tal3mrak in Saudi Arabia literally translates into "May god prolong your life" - and its used as a sign of respect when addressing royalty or influential business men in the Gulf region.

But a new use of the expression in the form of a Twitter hash-tag links to an outpouring of criticisms of the government from Saudi netizens and the wider Arab World who claim the royal family ignores Saudi Arabia's poor and are suppressing the spirit of dissent in the region.

A Saudi Arabian tweep, @Nawwarah82 outlined the King's failure to usher in reforms he had promised since the uprisings earlier this year in a tweet.

"You promised us progress, and we found ourselves late. You promised us a decent life, and we face high living expenses. You promised us the policy of "the open door" and gifted us the new anti-terror law"

She is referring to the hashtag #SaudiTerrorLaw - a proposed law that would make it easier for Saudi authorities to prosecute protesters and critics of the government with harsh penalties reserved for those charged with terrorism, including 15 year prison sentences.

It seems many are losing patience with the promise for reforms.

@manal_alsharif, the first woman who was arrested for driving her car in Saudi Arabia months ago, and in doing so defying a ban on women driving, tweeted:

"Since your sons and daughters are 20 million and we export 9 million barrels of oil per day, in which barrel do you think we should keep our patience?"

Saudi Arabia has seen a series of sporadic protests in recent months, in support of women's right to drive - and against rising consumer prices. Still, many worry that the government will come after those who use the hashtag to criticize the country.

Khadija Al Sheikh tweeted today:

"The guy who started the Hashtag #tal3mrak is probably tied up in a tinted GMC half way to Alrub3 ElKhaly Desert".

Whatever happens, Saudi will sooner or later have to confront what seems to be a shift in popular dissent, if not in the streets, then online.