Betsy Taylor
Climate consultant

Betsy Taylor is an adviser to several climate donors and foundations and is on the advisory board of 350.org. She was co-founder and Board President of 1Sky, a national campaign created in 2007 to focus the power of millions of concerned Americans on a single goal: bold federal action by 2010 that can reverse global warming and catalyze five million green jobs. Betsy is also a philanthropic consultant, public speaker and author on climate and sustainability issues.

She founded and served as president of the Center for a New American Dream (www.newdream.org) a national organization that helps Americans live and consume wisely for a better world During her tenure, the Center was featured in the media over 1,000 times, built an action network of over 100,000 citizens, launched the Responsible Purchasing Network, an association of socially and environmentally responsible purchasers representing over $50 billion in buying power, and earned numerous awards including winner of the Washingtonian Magazine’s top fifty places to work in the D.C. metropolitan area.

Betsy has appeared frequently on national television and radio and is the author of three books including co-author of Sustainable Planet: Solutions for the 21st Century. She previously served as Executive Director of the Merck Family Fund, Stern Family Fund, and Ottinger Foundation and has consulted with numerous foundations & donors including the Energy Foundation, Quixote Foundation, and Better Tomorrow Fund. She serves on the boards of CERES, Center for a New American Dream, Town Creek Foundation, Ottinger Foundation, Brighter Planet, Government Accountability Project, Garrison Institute, and 1Sky. Ms. Taylor’s philanthropic consulting & organizational leadership focus on innovative strategies for addressing climate change and creating a rapid pivot toward a sustainable and more equitable society.

She has an M.P.A. from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and a B.A. from Duke University. Aside from all this official stuff, she is frequently found happily hanging clothes up on her clothesline.