Is Canon Losing the Budget Videography Market

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Canon has long been a favorite in the video market, especially for wedding videographers and budget filmmakers. I began using Canon for videography way back in 1999 with the original Canon XL1 and GL1 that revolutionized the marketplace at the time. Again in 2008, Canon announced the 5D Mark II which almost accidentally created a new market for budget videographers. While the 5D Mark III had improvements for videographers, it fell short of the revolution they were looking for. Instead of improving the video performance of its DSLRs with 4k video, improvements in detail and dynamic range, or by adding features such as Log recording, focus peaking, and zebras, Canon instead pushed its C100, C300, and C500 cameras for this industry. Unfortunately, these cameras were priced between $7,000-$15,000. On the plus side, lack of enthusiasm has plagued these bodies and as a result falling prices have put them a bit more within reach for 1080p video though 4k capable C300 Mark II's still command a ridiculous $12,000. In the absence of improved video quality from Canon DSLRs or Mirrorless cameras under $5,000, the Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7s are now looking to claim the market that Canon first created which begs the question. Is Canon now going to lose this incredible market that they almost single handedly created?

Some of my personal favorite cameras for budget 4k videography:
Panasonic GH4 - The Panasonic GH4 is one of the most versatile cameras I have ever used. It is amazing that something so small and inexpensive can produce such stunning quality. Checkout the full review of the Panasonic GH4 at LearningCameras.com

Sony A7S II - This newest iteration of the Sony A7 series provides 4k recording paired with stunning low light abilities with a full frame sensor. While the A7SII is also a strong contender in the daylight, it isn't until you push the ISO past 1600 that your mouth drops with amazement as this Sony camera seems unfazed by these high ISOs. If you ever wanted to use the moon as your main light, the Sony A7SII is the camera for you. Check out the full review of the Sony A7SII at LearningCameras.com