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07/17/2010 05:42 pm ET Updated May 25, 2011

The GAO Transcripts, Part 15: Coordination is Easier Said Than Done

This is the fifteenth installment of the Government Accountability Office interview transcripts that were prepared pursuant to the July 2005 GAO report " Rebuilding Iraq: Actions Needed To Improve Use of Private Security Providers."

This transcript illustrates that nearly two years after the U.S. invaded Iraq the U.S. authorities' still had little ability to keep track of private security contractors, as this passage illustrates:

ROC currently does not have the manpower necessary to maintain a database of contractors __________ emphasized that contractors are not contractually required to participate in the PCO's ROC. Registration of contractors at the PCO is not cross-checked against a database of PSCs. The ROC does not maintain an attendance roster of PSCs

Interestingly, some companies took avoidable risks, such as "driving their cargo like a stagecoach" (i.e. driving without any protection or without notifying the military of their actions)" which should have raised their insurance costs.

The transcript also mentions a delicate topic, which is not talked about all that often in public, i.e. shooting incidents between contractors and soldiers:

Have there been any "blue on blue" or friendly fire incidents due to the military being unaware of private security contractors in their sector? There are many Blue on Blue incidents, but not because the military was not aware that PSCs were in their sector.

5. Can you site any situations in which the military has fired upon a private security contractor or contractor or vice versa? YES. What conditions led to this situation? Conditions range from poor fire discipline on the part of soldiers to deep anxiety and nervousness borne of many SVBIED (Suicide Vehicle Born Improvised Explosive Device) attacks. How does the PCO's ROC prevent friendly fire? The ROC documents cases of blue on blue and engages MNFI over them. It has proposed improvements to facilitate better coordination between PSCs and the military. It has provided PSCs with recommended TTPs for avoiding such incidents. Through the LMCC, it has enabled the military to have visibility on whom is in their AO.

Finally, given that the Commission Wartime Contracting held a hearing last month on "Are Private Security Contractors Performing Inherently Governmental Functions?" this passage should be of interest:

We have heard from several contractors that there is concern that __________ [Aegis] not sufficiently fulfilling their contract and that they are wary of sharing information with a peer. Many contractors believe that communication function performed under the___________ contract is an innately governmental position and should be performed by a DOD entity. Because of these concerns, several contractors have stated that they will utilize the PCO's resources but do not place much faith in the program? Engaging in firefights with terrorists is also an innately governmental position, but unless the government chooses to provide manpower far above current levels, we must rely on contractors to provide shooters, communicators and other experts fulfilling critical roles.

Standard disclaimer: I have put in ( _____ ) to reflect those words of phrases which have been blacked out in the transcript. I have also put in the underlining as it appeared in the original transcript. As in the transcript, I have left out letters from various words, even when it seems obvious what the word is.

Prepared. by: Kate Walker Index: Type bundle index here
Date Prepared: January 9, 2005 DOC Number: Type document number here
Reviewed by: Type reviewer name hem DOC Library: Type 1ibrary name here
Job Code: 350544

Record of Interview
Title VTC with PCO, Baghdad
Purpose To learn about status of the PCO
Contact Method Video-conference
Contact Place GAO HQ and Baghdad, Iraq
Contact Date January 18, 2005
Participants __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ ____________________ ____________________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________

Tim DiNapoli, Assistant Director, ASM, GAO
Carole Coffey, Analyst in Charge, DCM, GAO
Kate Walker, Analyst, DCM, GAO
Chris Durbin, Analyst, DCM, GAO
Mike Avenick, Analyst, DCM, GAO

Comments/Remarks:

We met with several members of the Project Contracting Office (PCO) staff and the Logistic Management Coordination Center (LMCC) via video-conference.

__________ in Baghdad, led the discussion. He opened our meeting by emphasizing that the theatre in Iraq is unprecedented and that lessons are being learned every day as the PCO adapts to the changing environment. __________ entioned that in addition to the items raised in our questions, the PCO would also like to address 1) PSB Insurance __________

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__________ __________ 2) the creation of a government armory to distribute
weapons locally in Iraq.

In response to our questions regarding the handover of the PCO to USACE, __________ ndicated that the rumor of the demise of the PCO was premature and that only parts of the PCO will be migrating to other areas. For example, USACE will maintain control of the administration of reconstruction projects. PCO contracting authority was moved to the GRD. Administrative contracting officer responsibility was sent to the GRD after the task order was issued. In September 2005, the PCO contracting was to be assimilated into GRD contracting.

Below follows the list of questions we sent the PCO and their responses. I have annotated their responses with notes from our conversation.

Current Status of the PCO and Security

1. Is the PCO currently disseminating information on the security situation to contractors and guiding contractor movement? Via the Regional Operation Center (ROC) at the PCO.

2. Which contractors are actively participating with the PCO? Participating contractors include, but are not limited to __________ __________ __________ __________ What resources does the PCO's ROC offer to PCO contractors?
1. Operations 2. Information 3. Coordination Non-PCO contractors? Same PCO subcontractors? Same Does the PCO maintain a database of participating contractors? Yes. Participation is voluntary, but registration, to the best of my knowledge is not cross-checked against a database of PCO security contractors (because a database does not exist).

(**Analyst note: __________ noted that the PCO's ROC has only been up and working since mid-October 2004 and that the ROC is still working out some kinks. The PCO's ROC serves as a facilitator for cooperation and advocacy for PSCs. __________ dicated that the PCO's ROC currently does not have the manpower necessary to maintain a database of contractors __________ emphasized that contractors are not contractually required to participate in the PCO's ROC. Registration of contractors at the PCO is not cross-checked against a database of PSCs. The ROC does not maintain an attendance roster of PSCs, however, all primes and subs are welcome to participate. __________ elieves that the ROC has been successful and sites that the UN and the Iraqi ministry have contacted the PCO regarding participation in the ROC. __________ r to send number of billets and staff at PCO.

The original design-build contractors had to provide all the security and life services. This was found to be cost-prohibitive and contractors have found a middle meeting ground by utilizing the PCO's LMCC and ROC. There was an initial handshake agreement that if contractors participated in the PCO's ROC and LMCC then medical and security responses would be provided to them. By having contractors participate in the LMCC, there was also hope that the cost of insurance for contractors in Iraq would decrease because the contractors would be better

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protected. For example, those companies that are "driving their cargo like a stagecoach" (i.e. driving without any protection or without notifying the military of their actions) should expect to pay more in insurance than those that are driving on secured roads with contact to the ROC and LMCC. LMCC hopes to maximize the benefit of coordination and decrease the escalating costs of insurance.

__________ informed us that the PCO has made aggressive attempts to try and get USAID to participate in the ROC and the LMCC, but USAID refused to participate. __________ described USAID as "not a team player." For example, USAID transferred authority of the Baghdad International Airport (BIA) to the Iraqi Ministry, which is now refusing to transfer big-ticket weapons. The military and Department of State were not conferred on this decision. Me. Holly indicated that dating back to the 1970's BIA was a notoriously poorly operating airport and that the Iraqis operating the airport were poorly trained. He believes that it was a poor decision to turn the airport over to the Iraqi's and that the importation of weapons and necessary military equipment will be severely hampered. In another example, USAID would not participate on an Economic Security Board that sought to prioritize security in Iraq)

3. Is the PCO's ROC fully operational and integrated with Iraq's regional operation centers? If you're referring to the Regional ROCs, the answer is yes. There is close coordination between the ROC and the RROCs.

(**Analyst Note: There are six regional operation centers planned. Only two of these operation centers are not fully operational--Camp Victory and Ramadi. Camp Victory has a life support problem. Ramadi is operating in a very dangerous work environment and is standing up a team in Fallujah until the Ramadi site is fully operational. __________ ndicated that Rarnadi has a very close relationship with the 1st MEF Marines unit in Fallujah. __________ ssed what steps would be taken to ensure that the transition from the 1st MEF to the 2nd MEF would be smooth and would ensure that the strong relationship with the ROC at Ramadi would be continued __________
indicated that while there would be a few organizational changes in the GX at division HQ, overall he believes that the transition will not change the active relationship between the ROC and the MEF.)

4. What is the current security situation in Iraq? Depending on the particular area, this can be a tough, challenging, difficult environment. Even short distance trips are dangerous, time-consuming and expensive. Project sites are subject to attack and loss of materials and workers because of treats and intimidation. For the latest information on the security situation in Iraq, contact DIA J-2. How has this situation changed since the initial arrival of troops in Iraq? A ground war evolved into an insurgency featuring asymmetric warfare and terrorism.

(**Analyst note: __________ndicated that defining the security situation in Iraq depends upon your frame of reference; the security situation varies depending on which area in Iraq is being discussed. __________ indicate that since the initial invasion of Iraq, the troops have gone from fighting a ground war to dealing with an insurgency.)

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5. Which contractors participate with the PCO's ROC? See above response to question 1. Can we have a list of participants? I do not maintain an attendance roster but am confident that 80 to 90% of the PSC community and all of the Primes and DBs are participating m ROC activities.

Movement Coordination

1. Does Aegis help plan contractor movements? Yes, by its participation in the ROC. How does __________ oordinate movement across Iraq? Via the ROC and its close relationship with the LMCC. For example, doe __________ oordinate movement by contacting Regional Operation Center's across Iraq? __________ and the RROCs are but two elements in movement coordination in Iraq, which features the LMCC and its Tapestry system, the ROC and its information, intelligence, coordination and operations services.

(**Analyst Note: __________ ROC works with the LMCC, regional ROC's, and the tapestry to plan movements. The LMCC takes the lead in movement planning and has visibility to MNFI. In order to plan and coordinate movement, LMCC has utilized transponders.
Per their design-build contracts, contractors were originally required to supply all security and medical support for their projects. However, the continued combat situation in Iraq has made furnishment of this level of support financially unfeasible for contractors, so a mutually agreeable (with the ROC) system of registering movements and using transponders has developed. In spring 2004, the LMCC encouraged participating contractors to purchase their own transponders and participate in the LMCC's operating system. The idea was for these contractors to purchase their own transponders but require these to have a common operating system among all contractors as well as a system that was compatible with the existing military transponder system. Contract modifications would have made these transponders government-furnished equipment (GFE). However, due to issues of oversight and interoperability problems, LMCC instead decided to purchase the transponders internally and distribute them to design-build contractors. The LMCC allocates one transponder for personnel movement and two transponders for convoy movement. After the LMCC originally decided to provide transponders for design-build contractors, 200 lower quality transponders were purchased due to the urgency and quick turn-over of the order. Thus, the military's 20-25K transponders did not have an emergency button system that can be alerted when under attack. The LMCC has since purchased nearly 400 new transponders that have emergency buttons.)

2. How are handoffs between divisions boundaries handled? Are their any overall DOD/CENTCOM policies guiding handoffs between divisions? Movements are coordinated through the LMCC which registers the movements with the theater movement control cell (TMCC). Usually there are no movement coordination measures required crossing the boundary of one MSC to another. When a convoy approaches a checkpoint, regardless of the AOR (area of responsibility), the March Credit document suffices to allow passage. If, however, coordination is required for a strategic move (i.e., large generator w/ military escorts), coordination measures are established in an OPORD (Operation Order)

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issued through the ROC (Regional Operation Center) to MNFI SOC (Security Operations Center) for MNCI execution.

(**Analyst Note: The LMCC registers movements with the TMCC. Currently, there are two systems for tracking movement in Iraq: (1) the March Credit system and (2) Tapestry. The March Credit system is a contractual obligation for passage between divisions. March Credit orders are issued by the control battalions. Once a contractor has applied for a March Credit order, they are then assigned an alphanumeric code. This code is validation that the military has received the movement order request and have notified all relevant parties on the route of movement that the contractor would be traveling in their AOR. Transponders under the Tapestry system allow for positive 1-2 minute updates on movements and validate March Credit order movements. In addition, a Fragmentary order (FRAGO) has been drafted that would require MNF (I) commanders to provide life support for certain contractors, including PSCs.)

3. Does the PCO inform division commanders of private security contractors moving into their AOR? Yes, if they are part of registered convoys or through the Tapestry system.

(**Analyst note: Division commanders are informed of the registered convoy via the tapestry system.)

4. Have there been any "blue on blue" or friendly fire incidents due to the military being unaware of private security contractors in their sector? There are many Blue on Blue incidents, but not because the military was not aware that PSCs were in their sector.

5. Can you site any situations in which the military has fired upon a private security contractor or contractor or vice versa? YES. What conditions led to this situation? Conditions range from poor fire discipline on the part of soldiers to deep anxiety and nervousness borne of many SVBIED (Suicide Vehicle Born Improvised Explosive Device) attacks. How does the PCO's ROC prevent friendly fire? The ROC documents cases of blue on blue and engages MNFI over them. It has proposed improvements to facilitate better coordination between PSCs and the military. It has provided PSCs with recommended TTPs for avoiding such incidents. Through the LMCC, it has enabled the military to have visibility on whom is in their AO.

(**Analyst note: March Credit document ave seen a rise in blue-on-blue incidents in the past 2.5 months __________o send a copy of TTP's regarding approaching the military." __________ ndicated that he had given a briefing regarding blue-on-blue incidents in December 2004. To nowledge, there had been only one incident in which a PSC shot at the military.)

Communication and Intelligence Sharing

1. To what extent can and are threat information shared between US military forces, the PCO, and other US government agencies? Limited. Could always be better. Growing. Foreign disclosure a problem.

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2. How does the PCO get intelligence/information from the military? FDO Pass-through. Is this information shared with PSCs? Yes. How is this intelligence shared with PSCs? In daily reports and spot reports or on an as requested basis.

(**Analyst Note: __________ ndicated that the informal intelligence fusion from contractors and private security companies was typically much better than the information than the information that he received from the military about road conditions, etc. in certain areas of Iraq __________ does not believe that there have been any problems bringing intelligence down to the classified level for contractors. __________ ndicated that he utilized the Private 'Security Company Association of Iraq (PSCAI) as a means to coordinate intelligence among private security contractors. For example,
__________ indicated that he would often issue request for information (RP'1) through PSCAI's email list to participating contractors. __________ would then share any information that he received with other private security contractor. __________ believes that the ROC helps to support the PSCAI's communication and information sharing efforts.

__________ indicated that the ROC was having a hard time getting SIPR or CENTRIX access at the PCO. The PCO has requested the appropriate authorities for access to SIPR. The PCO also has problems with phone accessibility; DSN access has been difficult as well.)

3. In our previous phone conversation with __________, we learned that __________ operates a password protected website. What type of information is found on this website? Ops/Int Who has access to this website? Registered & approved individuals. What is the process for achieving access to the website? Go to brief.aegisiraq.com Can we have access to the website? Yes.

(**Analyst Note: __________ ____________________ __________ ____________________

4. What is the PCO's relationship with the Overseas Advisory Council (OSAC)? Limited. OSAC is not very active and is limited to Americans--a small part of the PSC community. Does the PCOC use OSAC as a means of communication with private security contractors and contractors in Iraq? No.

5. How have you communicated the PCO's ROC mission with contractors and PSCs? Through the PSCAI, and word of mouth. How do contractors learn about the PCO's ROC and its resources? Well, the contractors ask questions, the ROC advertises its capabilities to whoever wants to listen.

6. Are there procedures that contractors must follow when contacting the PCO? Who are they contacting in the PCO? How do private security contractors and the PCO communicate? Email, phone and face to face. Can private security contractors contact the PCO directly or do they contact the PCO via, their CO? PSCs typically do not have COs, they have country managers or project managers. Normally, who conducts

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relations between PSCs and the PCO and ROC is determined by what needs to be discussed and who within the PSC is most appropriate to do so.

(**ANALYST NOTE: __________ indicated that there were no set procedures for contacting the PCO and contractors can contact the PCO directly.)

7. How does the PCO handle emergency situations? It notifies appropriate MNFI authorities. Can the PCO dispatch quick response teams? NO, there are no QRFs assigned to the PCO, they are to the military.

(**ANALYST NOTE: In addition to the PCO, there is also a tactical operation center at the American Embassy in Baghdad. The PCO does not send out quick response teams; the PCO is merely the platform for communication.)

8. Does the PCO have any arrangements with Multinational Forces Iraq and military units throughout Iraq to request quick reaction forces and emergency medical and medical evacuation support to private security contractors that come under attack and to deconflict/facilitate movement of private security details and convoys with military unit movements? On a not-to-interfere basis and as forces are available, MNFI has agreed to respond.

(**ANALYST NOTE: The PCO has responded to every situation of which they were informed.)

9. Do these arrangements differ depending on who lets the contract? Are contractors working for the PCO given priority over non-PCO contractors and subcontractors? Which particular contract the PSC is supporting at time of difficulty is not part of the decision matrix.

10. Does the PCO interact with __________ s Security Management Center? Not directly.

(**ANALYST NOTE: __________ indicated that __________ scope had a very limited scope supporting DOS. In addition, __________ ed that many of the PSCs have their own operation centers. The PSCs have tried to cobble together the intelligence centers from the various PSCs, but have run into problems with funding. PSCs have different budgets for their spending on intelligence gathering and, thus, it would be difficult to determine an appropriate fee for participating in a PSC-administered communication center. The PSCAI tried to address this gap and the PCO has further improved communications among PSCs.)

11. How do contractors and military units convey their location to the PCO? Contractors through beacon (transponder) system. Military does not. How do contractors contact the PCO while in movement? Sat phone or via beacon.

(** ANALYST NOTE: The LMCC maintains display software that allows the military to see all PCO participating contractor movements.)

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12. To what extent is the PCO's communications equipment interoperable with military communications equipment? VERY Limited. PCO does not share military comms. Do have cell phones and land line numbers.

(**ANALYST NOTE: __________ indicated that the PCO is currently using an MCI system that allows them to call out of theatre location from a remote line in the United States. The absence of shared VHF is a major concern for __________ also added that the military is reluctant to give contractors the full range of communications due to security concerns.)

13. Can the communication system between PSCs and the PCO's ROC be improved? How so? Yes. Common equipment. Costs many $$

(**ANALYST NOTE: __________ sked __________ which kinds of communication systems we would need to improve communications in Iraq. __________ ndicated that Thuraya phone systems, HF comms and VHF comms would improve communication. __________ ndicated that the use of Regional ROC's also helps to improve communication because RROC's can communicate directly with each other when persons traveling in their AOR are unable to communicate.)

14. Does the PCO's ROC write after-action reports? The PSCs write the after action reports. In which types of situations have these reports been written? When contact occurs. Do private security contractors participating in the PCO's ROC movement coordination relay any after-action or after-incident reports? Yes.

15. Does the PCO's ROC maintain a database of contractors working in Iraq? No. If so, how does the PCO collect this information on contractors? Which contractors are included in the database? Are subcontractors and non-DOD contractors included in the database? If this data is not currently being collected by the PCO's ROC, is any DOD organization collecting this information? Are there plans to implement the creation of a contractor database? The ROC does not have the manpower to establish and maintain a data base. Since every contractor coming into Iraq requires a CAC card (technically), I've asked one of staff to use this as a start point. I believe this is a function of IRMO and not the ROC, at least as we are currently configured. Bottom line, this is currently not being performed but we are working on establishing a start point.

(**ANALYST NOTE: __________ ndicated that the PCO does keep list of contractors on an ad hoc basis. The ROC does not have the manpower to maintain a working database of contractors. The PCO has used CAC card applications as a way to gauge the number of contractors working in Iraq. __________ ieves that the maintenance of a database of contractors should be an IRMO responsibility. __________ndicated that until July 2004, there was not even an automated database of contracts in Iraq. The PCO is still trying to get a list of Iraqi contracts and authorized dates of service. There are a number of reasons that a database would be helpful, including knowledge of the constant movement of contractors, personnel recovery issues. Without a database of contractors, it would be difficult to gauge the "damage done when contractors fall into the wrong hands.")

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16. Does the PCO track casualties or incidents involving private security contractors or contractors? I don't think so. Does the PCO track casualties or incidents involving the military? No.

( **ANALYST NOTE: The GRD does maintain metrics on those incidents (KIA's and WIA's) that affect their ability to meet delivery and destination goals.)

17. We have heard from several contractors that there is concern that __________ [Aegis] not sufficiently fulfilling their contract and that they are wary of sharing information with a peer. Many contractors believe that communication function performed under the___________ contract is an innately governmental position and should be performed by a DOD entity. Because of these concerns, several contractors have stated that they will utilize the PCO's resources but do not place much faith in the program? Engaging in firefights with terrorists is also an innately governmental position, but unless the government chooses to provide manpower far above current levels, we must rely on contractors to provide shooters, communicators and other experts fulfilling critical roles. "As for not sufficiently fulfilling their contract", it's true that __________ got off to a rocky start last summer __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
heir performance has improved markedly and they were recently provided by the Contracting Officer with a (nonbinding) notice of intent to exercise its option. Some of these rumors can be attributed to a lingering perception from these early days of the contract. Others may be based in the competitive reluctance of other PSCs to deal with __________ fear of losing a client to __________ Has the PCO heard these rumors and what steps have been taken to address these concerns? We've heard them, although in diminishing intensity over the past several weeks. PCO and the ROC operate in a transparent fashion which should alleviate such concerns. We oversee __________ performance on a continual basis. We will seek continued process improvement.

Weapons

1. What type of weapons do __________ ersonnel use while protecting PCO personnel? M4, NIPS and AK 47 rifles, Glock 17 and 19 and CZ 75 pistols and Minimi as team weapon.

2. The Draft Interagency Memorandum indicates that the PCO would be responsible for maintaining a list of weapons and ammunition that are approved by the USG for issuance. Does the PCO o__________ ently maintain this list? __________ not responsible for maintaining the list. The weapon procurement was approved by COR, PCO and DOS. That list has been superseded by a law signed by Ambassador Bremer just prior to his departure which authorizes PSCs to carry military-level weapons.

3. Under Memorandum 17, Iraq's Ministry of Interior (MO!) is supposed to issue weapons cards. Is the MOI administering Weapons Cards? Yes, to registered PSCs.

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If not, why not and who is administering these cards? If MoI does not do it, it isn't done.

4. Have you heard of any contractors that have encountered difficulties in obtaining weapons? YES.

( **ANALYST NOTE: __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ ____________________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________

Chain of Command

1. What authority does the PCO's ROC have over private security contractors? No authority, but collegial suggestions.

2. What authority does the combatant commander have over __________ employees? Coalition military runs Iraq security, what MNF1 says, goes.

Contracting Issues

I. Does the PCO have any lessons learned with regard to contracting for security providers and/or security related equipment, such as armored vehicles, body armor, and communication devices? What actions are you taking to incorporate these lessons in new procurements? Similarly, what approach are you taking to share or disseminate your solutions to other agencies or departments? Because of the nature of __________ costs-plus contract, PCO Security reviews all requests for purchase of equipment. It may accept, reject, modify or send such requests back to __________ or further information. The Contracting Officer then reviews and decides whether to authorize purchase by __________ As to lessons learned by __________ ey state as follows: __________ Training Wing includes our operational research function. It collates feedback from our own

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organization, selected other companies and special operations units where possible. This is then factored in to our reviews of: Training, SOPS and Equipment Procurement. Our external feedback goes routinely to the RSO and PCO and specifically (e.g. in the case of our vehicle escort policy note) to Dir PCO and widely within and without the organization."

2. From your perspective, does the PCO have sufficient visibility over security providers and security related costs? What management controls or tools are in place that assists you in these areas? Does the PCO have new initiatives or plans that would improve control or visibility over security providers and security-related costs? See our response to Contracting Issues Question One, above.

3. The __________ ntract indicates that the military is responsible for threats above Level I. Who determines the threat level and is there a set chain of command for events entailing threat levels above level I? The military generally determines the threat level. However, the Embassy also determines threat response for COM personnel and may, for example, bar PCO personnel from traveling certain routes even when, as with Route Irish, MNFI has said it's okay. PCO must answer to both chains of command. Does __________ ve a military contact for times of immediate need or are all requests for military assistance sent through the Contracting Officer? Requests for military assistance are sent either through the ROCs/RROCs or the Security Directorate, not the Contracting Officer.

4. The original contract with __________ equired that the contractor comply with DOD regulations, directives, instructions, general orders, policies, procedures and in particular Army Regulation 715-9 and Field Manual 3-100.21. Did the PCO provide __________ ith a comprehensive list of guiding documents and, if so, what are these documents? No.

5. Can we have contact information for __________ Yes. Please contact its ______________________________________________________________________