CRIME
06/09/2016 12:17 pm ET Updated Jan 03, 2017

Brock Turner's Sentence Will Be Even Shorter Than You Think

The sex offender and former Stanford student is scheduled to spend just 3 months in jail, where he will be under protective custody.

The Stanford sex offender who blamed his assault of an unconscious woman on the "peer pressure" of fitting in at college was sentenced to just six months in jail. But he'll likely spend less time than that behind bars.

Brock Turner was sentenced June 2 to six months in county jail followed by three years of probation. But booking records show he'll walk out of his cell on Sept. 2 -- after just three months.

During his brief stay behind bars, Turner will remain in protective custody, as perpetrators of sexual assault are often targeted by other inmates, according to TMZ.  

Booking information for Turner shows his scheduled release date is Sept. 2.
Santa Clara Department of Correction
Booking information for Turner shows his scheduled release date is Sept. 2.

His release date takes into consideration that he will likely not misbehave, allowing him to get out earlier for good behavior, The Daily Mail points out. 

Former Stanford student Brock Turner who was sentenced to six months in county jail for the sexual assault of an unconscious
Handout . / Reuters
Former Stanford student Brock Turner who was sentenced to six months in county jail for the sexual assault of an unconscious and intoxicated woman is shown in this Santa Clara County Sheriff's booking photo taken January 18, 2015, and received June 7, 2016. Santa Clara County Sheriff's Department/Handout via REUTERS 

In a tone-deaf statement by the 20-year-old sex offender, Turner blamed his actions on Stanford's "party culture" while simultaneously turning himself into the victim of his own horrific actions:

"I've been shattered by the party culture and risk taking behavior that I briefly experienced in my four months at school," Turner's statement reads. "I've lost my chance to swim in the Olympics. I've lost my ability to obtain a Stanford degree. I've lost employment opportunity, my reputation and most of all, my life."

Turner's father had an equally outrageous statement, saying his son's conviction is "a steep price to pay for 20 minutes of action out of his 20 plus years of life."

That "20 minutes of action" included Turner penetrating an intoxicated, unconscious woman until two Swedish Stanford students took notice of the assault. Turner attempted to run, leaving the woman in the dirt, before being tackled by the men.

"One needs to recognize the influence that peer pressure and the attitude of having to fit in can have on someone," Turner said in his statement. "One decision has the potential to change your entire life."

No one peer pressured you into sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, Mr. Turner.  

CONVERSATIONS