OWN
02/01/2016 10:33 am ET

What It's Like To Date As A Transgender Teen

"Not many guys have crushes on me," says Jazz Jennings. "They think that if they like me, they'll be called 'gay.'"

At 14, Jazz Jennings is at the age where one particular social topic tends to dominate all the others: dating.

As many of her peers begin to go out on dates or at least think about dating, Jazz says she's not opposed to the idea of exploring a relationship. "I just go with the flow and see what happens. If boys like me and I like them back, then, yeah, it'll happen," she tells "Oprah: Where Are They Now?"

Jazz is open to dating, but says that boys haven't shown interest in her because she is transgender.
Courtesy of Jazz Jennings
Jazz is open to dating, but says that boys haven't shown interest in her because she is transgender.

However, Jazz's reality is that boys thus far haven't shown interest in her.

"Boys aren't really accepting of me because I'm transgender," she explains. "Not many guys have crushes on me -- at least, at my school. They think that if they like me, they'll be called 'gay' by their friends because they like another 'boy.'"

After transitioning at age 5, Jazz began appearing the the public eye and soon became one of the youngest transgender advocat
Courtesy of Jazz Jennings
After transitioning at age 5, Jazz began appearing the the public eye and soon became one of the youngest transgender advocates in the national spotlight.

Though Jazz has been presenting as female since age 5, she says that the boys at her school still don't see her as a girl. It can be an incredibly difficult matter to face, but Jazz credits her family with giving her the strength to always stand in her truth.

"I think I was born with a natural confidence inside and strength, but my parents were able to help me realize that," she says. "Not just my parents. My family. They were able to help me realize that, by giving me unconditional love and acceptance... I learned to love myself."

Jazz's incredibly supportive parents and three older siblings have helped the teen allow her natural confidence to shine, she
Courtesy of Jazz Jennings
Jazz's incredibly supportive parents and three older siblings have helped the teen allow her natural confidence to shine, she says.

As the youngest in her family, Jazz has an older sister and older twin brothers. The boys, she says, seemed to have a relatively easy time with her transition.

"They were so young when I transitioned that they don't even remember me living as a boy," Jazz points out. "But my sister was a little bit older. She handled it differently, because she wasn't going to be the 'princess' of the house anymore."

That's when Jazz's sister came to an important realization, during a talk with the girls' parents.

"They told her the truth: that if I cannot live as a girl, then I might not be happy," Jazz says. "And she's like, 'I just want my sister to be happy.' So, that's how my siblings became accepting of me."

"Oprah: Where Are They Now?" airs Saturdays at 10 p.m. ET on OWN.

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