WEIRD NEWS

Artist Turns Dust Bunnies Into Rabbit Sculptures

She's kicking off the dust of the boring art world.

Some people look at the dust bunnies in their home and see a mess.

Suzanne Proulx sees the makings of a masterpiece.

The Erie, Pennsylvania-based artist has made a name for herself by creating works of art using dust, dirt and lint. 

  • Previously, she made self-portraits using household dust, but she turned dust bunnies into rabbit sculptures for her current
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    Previously, she made self-portraits using household dust, but she turned dust bunnies into rabbit sculptures for her current project.
  • Proulx was commissioned by <a href="http://www.febrezeairpurifiers.com" target="_blank">Febreze Air Purifiers</a> to make the
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    Proulx was commissioned by Febreze Air Purifiers to make the sculptures out of 40 pounds of dust ― the average amount that the average American home collects in a year.
  • Collecting all that dust at once can be a challenge for even the biggest slob, so Proulx relied on friends, neighbors and stu
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    Collecting all that dust at once can be a challenge for even the biggest slob, so Proulx relied on friends, neighbors and students at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, where she is an assistant professor.
  • &ldquo;People were very helpful,&rdquo; Proulx told The Huffington Post. &ldquo;Some people sent packets of bunny fur through
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    “People were very helpful,” Proulx told The Huffington Post. “Some people sent packets of bunny fur through the mail. My students gave me lint from the dormitory laundry machines and others reached out through Facebook.”
  • Making the dust bunnies look like actual bunnies presented some challenges. 

Proulx had to build little skeleton-like armatu
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    Making the dust bunnies look like actual bunnies presented some challenges. Proulx had to build little skeleton-like armatures and then cover them with mesh shaped like rabbit heads, rib cage and feet. She then sprayed them with shellac and spray adhesive, before sewing together the different parts.
  • Ironically, Proulx had to suffer for her art while doing the project.
"The irony is that I've suffered from allergies and onl
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    Ironically, Proulx had to suffer for her art while doing the project. "The irony is that I've suffered from allergies and only found out this past summer that the only thing I'm allergic to is dust," she laughed.
  • She also learned that not all dust is created equal from an artistic perspective.

“The fur from long-haired animals helped h
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    She also learned that not all dust is created equal from an artistic perspective. “The fur from long-haired animals helped hold things together,” Proulx said. “Vacuum lint can be dirty. You have to pick out the finer parts.”
  • The finished sculptures are being displayed behind glass at Febreze headquarters in Marlborough, Massachusetts, but Proulx is
    Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
    The finished sculptures are being displayed behind glass at Febreze headquarters in Marlborough, Massachusetts, but Proulx isn’t washing her hands of doing future “dustworks.”
  • Josh Reynolds/AP Images for Febreze Air Purifiers
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BEFORE YOU GO

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