HUFFINGTON POST
01/30/2017 03:40 pm ET

France Bans Free Soda Refills In Latest Effort To Fight Obesity

The move follows several other health measures, including a soda tax.

Unlimited sugary beverages are now a thing of the past in France’s public eateries.

In a new rule that went into effect on Friday, the country outlawed free or fixed-price refills on soda and other sugary drinks in its latest effort to tackle obesity,  the BBC reported.

The law follows recommendations by the World Health Organization, which has also suggested taxing sugary drinks to decrease their consumption.

“Reduced consumption of sugary drinks means lower intake of ‘free sugars’ and calories overall, improved nutrition and fewer people suffering from overweight, obesity, diabetes and tooth decay,” the health agency stated in a release.

Free refills on sugary beverages are now banned in France. It's the country's latest effort to fight obesity.
Moxie Productions via Getty Images
Free refills on sugary beverages are now banned in France. It's the country's latest effort to fight obesity.

On average, nearly one out of six adults in the European Union is considered obese, though France’s number of obese adults is a little less than the EU’s average, according to the European health Interview Survey released in October.

In contrast, more than one-third of adults in the United States are considered to be obese, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The refill ban is just the latest health measure put in place by the French.

In 2014 the country banned vending machines from schools, and starting in 2011, school cafeterias were limited to serving French fries once a week. France has also imposed a soda tax, the New York Times reported. 

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