It's 2018. If they don't vote for net neutrality, let's vote them out.

Let’s face it. 2017 was a dumpster fire from beginning to end. One of the low points, though, was when the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ignored the overwhelming majority of people from across the political spectrum and voted to gut net neutrality protections that prevent Internet providers like Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T from controlling what we see and do online with censorship, throttling, and extra fees.

But here’s the good news: there’s a concrete and simple way that Congress can overrule the FCC’s terrible vote and keep the Internet free and open. Fight for the Future just launched a hard-hitting campaign to make sure that they do. The plan is simple: if they don’t vote for net neutrality in 2018, vote them out.

29 Senators have already signed on to support a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution to overturn the FCC’s corrupt repeal of net neutrality. We only need one more Senator to force it to a vote on the floor. Then if it passes the Senate, we’ll have to get a number of Republicans in the House to support it in order to force a vote there. But with 3 out of 4 Republican voters in support of net neutrality and a handful of GOP lawmakers already coming out publicly against the FCC move, that’s increasingly within reach.

Pundits keep asking whether net neutrality is going to be an election issue in 2018. Let’s make it one.

The VoteForNetNeutrality.com campaign calls on Internet users to pledge to not vote for any member of Congress who does not support the CRA vote to overturn the FCC decision. You can enter your phone number, or text VOTE to 384-387, and the tool will deliver your pledge to Congress, and then text you in with your lawmakers’ voting record in the run-up to the next election.

Cool huh? Go here to take the pledge, then share this. If enough of us do this, we can beat the lobbyists and force Congress to overrule the FCC and preserve free expression and an open Internet for generations to come.

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