Kickstarter Success Story will Change Your Golf Game Forever

02/24/2017 06:25 pm ET
Automatic game tracking can really amp up your golf game performance long term
teamstickergiant/flickr
Automatic game tracking can really amp up your golf game performance long term

There are approximately 25 million golfers in the U.S., and surveys have found that the millennial generation embraces the sport in big numbers. As a result, it’s no surprise that efforts to make golf tracking more tech-friendly have increased greatly during the past few years.

One of the first major successes in this niche were Golf Tags that use Near Field Communication Technology to track and export data to Android devices. Now, the same company behind Golf Tags has launched a new Kickstarter for their iPhone compatible Golf Pad Link.

The first Golf Tags Kickstarter attracted 659 backers and more than tripled its original goal. With that in mind, it’s not surprising that the latest version has connected with more than 800 backers and has already almost doubled its modest $60,000 funding goal. These numbers are indicative of the strong interest that most golfers have in improving their game, but what exactly are they getting for their donation of $99 or more?

Automatic Game Tracking

In the past, if someone wanted to track their swing and distance, they’d have to rely on video recording devices and imperfect measuring techniques. Next, this information would need to be transferred to a spreadsheet and analyzed to look for strengths and weaknesses. Unsurprisingly, this level of time, attention to detail and dedication prevented many golfers from getting the answers that they needed in order to improve.

Golf Tags changed all of this by enabling golfers to put an electronic tagging device on 15 clubs. The Golf Tags then capture and provide tracking details that can be easily analyzed for necessary performance tweaks. The comprehensive tracking was designed to work with more than 40,000 golf courses worldwide.

To improve upon this successful formula, the creative minds behind Golf Tags knew that they’d need to incorporate Apple devices. Fortunately, the Golf Pad Link not only addresses this need but also takes the entire concept another important step further. When the Golf Pad Link begins shipping to Kickstarter backers in May, it will include wireless technology that can automatically and instantly sync with the user’s smartphone or smartwatch.

How Does This Change the User’s Golf Game?

One of the most impressive features of the Golf Pad is that it’s able to wirelessly compute which golf club is best for each situation. In other words, this system does much more than track the user’s performance; it also acts as a virtual replacement for a golf instructor.

The data can transfer immediately to the Golf Pad Link app for an instant analysis. Alternatively, users can wait until they’re done golfing to sync everything. Either way, the results point out important details such as shot dispersion, distance trends and strokes gained. This personalized report also comes with a course strategy that will make it easier for golfers to boost their performance in a shorter period of time.

Golfing Nationwide

Golf may not be referred to as our national pastime, but it’s long been one of the favorite hobbies of the President of the United States. For example, President Barack Obama was known to unwind with 18 holes, and President Donald Trump has continued this tradition.

There are golf courses in all 50 states, and it’s no surprise that Florida leads the pack with more than 1,000 places to hit the links. Research has proven that golf offers numerous physical and mental health benefits, including reduced stress, increased brain stimulation and improved heart health.

According to one study, playing golf regularly can even boost your life expectancy by five years! When you combine this with the social and competitive aspects of playing 9 or 18 holes, it’s no wonder that people have flocked to the Kickstarter campaigns for Golf Tags and the Golf Pad Link.

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