WOMEN
08/27/2018 12:47 pm ET

NASA's Katherine Johnson Honored With Statue, Scholarship On 100th Birthday

Taraji P. Henson portrayed Johnson in 2016's "Hidden Figures."

West Virginia State University honored NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson’s 100th birthday with a statue and scholarship dedication over the weekend.

Hundreds of people ― including 75 of Johnson’s children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren ― attended the event honoring the woman who was portrayed by Taraji P. Henson in the 2016 film “Hidden Figures,” according to the West Virginia Gazette. The bronze statue of Johnson was unveiled Saturday, one day before she turned 100. 

The scholarship in Johnson’s name was awarded to freshmen Jasiaha Daniels and Alexis Scudero, both of whom are studying in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. 

“What makes Katherine so extraordinary is she not only prevailed while segregation failed, Dr. Johnson has continued to persevere and thrive with the gracious poise and clarity that defies mere words of explanation, let alone definition,” said Dr. Yvonne Cagle, the keynote speaker at the ceremony and the space and life sciences directorate at the Johnson Space Center.

Johnson started attending WSVU when she was 14 because she wasn’t able to receive further education in Greenbrier County. She graduated from the university in 1937 with degrees in both mathematics and French, then went on to pursue graduate studies at the institution.

Then-President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson on Nov. 2
Carlos Barria / Reuters
Then-President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson on Nov. 24, 2015. 

Johnson was a teacher for 15 years, then joined the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, which later became NASA. She and three other women calculated rocket trajectories and orbits for some of the earliest American voyages into space, including helping astronaut John Glenn orbit the Earth three times. 

Then-President Barack Obama awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States’ highest civilian honor, in 2015.

“What can you say after a century about someone like Dr. Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson — our very own global, global genius?” Cagle asked Saturday. “Let’s see — you say nothing. You don’t say anything. You listen.” 

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