Objectification Of Queer Expression

I am called disgusting, inappropriate, and traumatizing to those around me.
05/17/2017 06:07 pm ET Updated Oct 31, 2017

As a Queer person, I know that my community of people have found it difficult to freely express themselves.

Throughout time, Gay men and women, Bisexual individuals, and the Transgender population have experienced oppression.

Historically, Queer people have been systematically coerced into hetero-normative marriages. We have given birth to or raised children as straight, closeted individuals and have lived lives that society forcibly put in place for us. Queer people have also been subject to police brutality, many forms of discrimination and even murder. This continues today. Transgender women, for example, are the most violently targeted population of people in the United States. These women are killed for pursuing their bodies, forming identities and expressing themselves through clothing. For these people, death is the penalty when striving towards self affirming purpose.

Overall we live in a country that does not embrace our wish to express any aspect of who we are: while the cis, hetero, dominate majority has every opportunity to do so.

Within my own life as an Intersex Genderqueer person, I have experienced this oppression in my own way.

When I wear a crop top or short shorts; I am a slut, whore or skank. If people see that my nipples, tongue, and navel are pierced, the assumption is that I must want to be raped, groped or assaulted. Somehow my body pride and body expression, which is not inherently sexual, means that I want the “cock”, pain, suffering or humiliation.

I am called disgusting, inappropriate, and traumatizing to those around me. My friends, family and community have shamed me for simply showing my legs and stomach.

My body is not inherently sexual but still society gives it an X rating. One thing that many people don’t understand, is that nothing holds a meaning, description or sexual connotation without a person, group or culture assigning it that value.

I want to live in a world that minds it’s own business, doesn’t police my body or clothing, and treats me with respect! I want what I deserve: a life without limitations on being me.

“I believe in a future where we don’t have anyone telling us how to express ourselves — be that the bullies at school, the police, or even our own friends and families.”

-Alok Vaid-Menon

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